Subject Selection Guide

Subject Selection Guide

Featured below is a subject selection guide for families. This is a resource that allows parents and students to see all of the curriculum offerings at St Columba College. Simply select your year level and learning area to begin.

Please select a year level

Information Processing and Publishing B


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Business Enterprise and Technology

Required Background: Completion of Year 9 Digital Technology.

Subject Overview

Web Design
Students will create web pages using Dreamweaver. This will incorporate some Desktop Publishing skills:

  • Contrast, Alignment, Repetition and Proximity;
  • Scanning graphics and text (OCR);
  • Online typography;
  • Using digital cameras and scanners;
  • Downloading graphics, animations and multimedia files;
  • Creating GIF animations;
  • Implementing design skills.

Multimedia
Students will continue to develop design skills, using Macromedia Flash. They will focus on:

  • Creating tweens (movement);
  • Online typography;
  • Creating buttons

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Assessment Type 1 Issues Study (20%)

  • Issue analysis

Assessment Type 2 Practical (50%)

  • Product design
  • Product creation

Assessment Type 3 Product & Documentation (30%)

  • Product Investigating & Devising
  • Product producing
  • Product Evaluating

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Year 11 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Information, Processing & Publishing include: Year 11 Information Technology or Information Processing and Publishing.

Information Processing and Publishing A


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Business Enterprise and Technology

Required Background: Completion of Year 9 Digital Technology.

Subject Overview

Publications for Print
Students will employ Adobe Photoshop to develop a variety of display techniques in the presentation of documents designed for a number of different purposes, including:

  • Menus;
  • Reports and essays;
  • Advertisements;
  • Resumes;
  • Event programs;
  • DVD covers.

Image Manipulation
Students will be introduced to Adobe Photoshop and will:

  • Manipulate and edit images and text;
  • Use layers, filters and effects;
  • Develop design skills and typography;
  • Set page properties.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Assessment Type 1 Issues Study (20%)

  • Issue analysis

Assessment Type 2 Practical (50%)

  • Product design
  • Product creation

Assessment Type 3 Product & Documentation (30%)

  • Product Investigating & Devising
  • Product producing
  • Product Evaluating

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Year 11 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Information, Processing & Publishing include: Year 11 Information Technology or Information Processing and Publishing.

Biology


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Science

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 Science

Subject Overview

In Stage 1 Biology students develop their understanding of the structure and function of living things, and how they interact with their own and other species and their environments.
Students design, conduct, and gather evidence from their biological investigations. As they explore a range of relevant issues, students recognise that the body of biological knowledge is constantly changing and increasing through the application of new ideas and technologies.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 Biology through the following topics:

Cells and Microorganisms

  • Cell Theory, Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic cell structure and function, organelles, cell divison (Mitosis and Binary Fision), Cell Membrane, Microorganisms various roles,

Infectious Diseases

  • Infection and Non Infection diseases, Transmission, Pathogen actions, Human body protection again disease, Immunity

Multicellular Organisims

  • Hierarchal structure of organisation, Exchange of materials (lungs, plants and gases, digestive system, root system in plants, nephrons), Circulatory and Lymph systems, Transport of water in plants,

Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics

  • Importance of Biodiversity, Classification, Adaptations, Biotic and abiotic, Succession, Human impact on ecosystems, Importance of genetic diversity

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Investigations Folio (60%)

  • Practical Investigations with written reports
  • Science as a Human Endeavour Investigation

Skills and Applications Tasks (40%)

  • Oral Presentation
  • Assignment
  • Topic Tests

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Biology include: Stage 2 Biology and/or Stage 2 Scientific Studies.

Indonesian


(Full Year of Study) Learning Area: Languages

Subject Overview

The Australian Curriculum for Indonesian is built around two interrelated strands of Communicating and Understanding. Learners interact using Indonesian in classroom routines and communicative tasks. Learners engage with a range of texts in Indonesian. They participate individually and in groups in tasks and experiences. Learners acquire skills in analysing and translating increasingly complex texts, such as emails, recipes, poems, articles and songs. They use modelled language to write for personal and public purposes, such as journal entries, emails, blogs, scripts, and poetry. Learners extend their grammatical knowledge and metalanguage while beginning to explore important features of Indonesian. They consider connections between language and culture and make comparisons with their own language and culture. They consider language variation and change, including through exposure to colloquial language and language in context.

Students undertake study in Year 9 Indonesian through the following concepts:

Nongkrong: How do we hang out?

  • What is friendship and what are our friends like?
  • Why and where do friends hang out?
  • What are some of the issues in hanging out?

Garuda di Dadaku2

  • Friendship and sport in Indonesian films.
  • How do we give our opinion of films?

Pulang-Pergi: Why do we travel?

  • What kinds of travel are important to us?
  • How do we handle new situations when we travel?
  • How do we use clues to find our way around?

Kesehatan: How do we care for ourselves?

  • How do we understand health, illness and wellness?
  • What health issues matter to you?

Penerjemahan: Why and how do we translate?

  • What is the purpose of translation?
  • How do we translate from one language to another?
  • What role does culture play in translation?

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Communicating (50%)

  • Oral Interaction
  • Text Production
  • Tests

Understanding Language and Culture (50%)

  • Text Analysis – Listening and Responding
  • Text Analysis – Reading and Responding
  • Reflection in English
  • Tests

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Year 10 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 9 Indonesian include: Indonesian.

Physical Education


(Full Year of Study) Learning Area: Health and Physical Education

Subject Overview

The Australian Curriculum for Health and Physical Education supports students to refine and apply strategies for maintaining a positive outlook and evaluating behavioural expectations in different leisure, social, movement and online situations. Students learn to apply health and physical activity information to devise and implement personalised plans for maintaining healthy and active habits. They also experience different roles that contribute to successful participation in physical activity, and propose strategies to support the development of preventive health practices that build and optimise community health and wellbeing. Students learn to apply more specialised movement skills and complex movement strategies and concepts in different movement environments. They also explore movement concepts and strategies to evaluate and refine their own and others’ movement performances. The curriculum also provides opportunities for students to refine and consolidate personal and social skills in demonstrating leadership, teamwork and collaboration in a range of physical activities.

Students undertake study in Year 9 Physical Education through the following topics:

Athletics

  • Individual Track and Field events in preparation for sports day

Badminton

  • Overhead clear, smash, drop shot, net roll, net kill, application to singles and doubles games

Netball

  • Passing, shooting, scoring, application of rules, attacking and defensive strategies

Soccer

  • Passing, trapping, dribbling, heading, application of rules, small sided game play

Softball

  • Throwing, catching, pitching, application of rules, scoring, small sided game play

Touch Football

  • Passing, roll ball, rucking sequence, application of tactics, small sided game play

Sticks Practical

  • Table tennis, tennis, hockey, softball, golf, indoor hockey, sofcrosse

Indigenous Games Peer Teaching

  • Elements of coaching session, warm up, cool down, skill development

Sports Injuries

  • Ricer, totaps, no harm, application of basic first aid principles

Health Benefits of Physical Activity

  • Sedentary behaviours and their impact on health and wellbeing

Peer Pressure: Drugs and Alcohol

  • Forms of peer pressure, positive ways to deal with a range of situations

Body Image

  • Four aspects of body image, why a positive body image is import, body dissatisfaction, strategies to improve body image

Food Advertising

  • Health state of Australia’s youth, link between their lifestyle choices and their state of health

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Practical (60%)

  • Practical skills and application
  • Initiative, collaboration and interpersonal skills

Health (40%)

  • Assignments
  • Projects
  • Investigations

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Year 10 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 9 Physical Education include: Year 10 Physical Education.

Design and Technology B


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Business Enterprise and Technology

Required Background: Completion of Year 8 Design & Technology.

Subject Overview

Students demonstrate their design and technological ability through activities in contexts that have a practical outcome. They develop the ability to initiate, create and develop products in response to a design brief and evaluate the process and final product. Students develop skills and techniques to competently use tools and materials safely. Projects are designed using industry standard CAD software. Students have opportunity to create 3D printed designs. The materials include Wood and Metal, while the processes include Electronics, joint construction, soldering, braze and spot-welding and fabrication.

Students undertake study in Year 9 Design & Technology through the following topics:

Woodwork

  • Extend their knowledge of the Investigate, Design, Produce and Evaluate (IDPE) process.
  • Learn various skills associated with woodwork in the production of a CO2 Dragster or similar small wood project.
  • Develop competence in the use of basic hand tools: steel rule, marking gauge, try square, tenon saw, smoothing plane and various rasps and files.
  • Develop competence in the safe use of machinery including the Bandsaw, Drill Press, Disk Sander and Bobbin Sander.

Metalwork

  • Learn various skills associated with metal work in the construction of the metal components of the dragster.
  • Develop competence in the use of basic hand tools: steel rule, engineers square, spring dividers, scriber, hacksaw and various files.
  • Develop competence in the safe use of the gas welding system by learning how to Braze and Fusion weld.

Computer Aided Design

  • Use Autodesk Inventor to learn various skills associated with CAD in the production of 2 Dimensional and 3-Dimensional diagrams.
  • Learn to draw third angle orthographic diagrams.
  • Learn to draw sectioned and isometric diagrams.
  • Design 3D component for the CO2 dragster
  • 3D print the designed components

Electronics

  • Learn basic theory of electricity and how circuits work.
  • Learn to identify and describe the function of common electronic components.
  • Design and create simple circuits such as an LED torch.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Folio (30%)

  • Journal entries
  • Safety research,
  • Product design
  • Product evaluation

Skills & Application (70%)

  • Joint construction
  • Project construction
  • Safe work practices

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Year 10 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 9 Design & Technology include: Year 10 Material Products.

Design and Technology A


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Business Enterprise and Technology

Required Background: Completion of Year 8 Design & Technology.

Subject Overview

Students demonstrate their design and technological ability through activities in contexts that have a practical outcome. They develop the ability to initiate, create and develop products in response to a design brief and evaluate the process and final product. Students develop skills and techniques to competently use tools and materials safely. Projects are designed using industry standard CAD software. Students have opportunity to create 3D printed designs. The materials include Wood and Metal, while the processes include Electronics, joint construction, soldering, braze and spot-welding and fabrication.

Students undertake study in Year 9 Design & Technology through the following units:

Woodwork

  • Extend their knowledge of the Investigate, Design, Produce and Evaluate (IDPE) process.
  • Learn various skills associated with woodwork in the production of a Trinket box, Spice rack or similar small wood project.
  • Develop competence in the use of basic hand tools: steel rule, marking gauge, try square, tenon saw, smoothing plane and various rasps and files.
  • Develop competence in the safe use of machinery including the Bandsaw, Drill Press, Disk Sander and Bobbin Sander.

Metalwork

  • Learn various skills associated with metal work in the construction of a student designed Candelabra, mirror frame or Small Sheet Metal Toolbox.
  • Develop competence in the use of basic hand tools: steel rule, engineers square, spring dividers, scriber, hacksaw and various files.
  • Develop competence in the safe use of the gas welding system by learning how to Braze and Fusion weld.
  • Use metal craft scrolling tools to shape and cold form metal.

Computer Aided Design

  • Use Autodesk Inventor to learn various skills associated with CAD in the production of 2 Dimensional and 3-Dimensional diagrams.
  • Learn to draw third angle orthographic diagrams.
  • Learn to draw sectioned and isometric diagrams.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Folio (30%)

  • Journal entries
  • Safety research,
  • Product design
  • Product evaluation

Skills & Application (70%)

  • Joint construction
  • Project construction
  • Safe work practices

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Year 10 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 9 Design & Technology include: Year 10 Material Products.

Digital Technology B


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Business Enterprise and Technology

Required Background: Completion of year 8 Digital Technology.

Subject Overview

Students learn the fundamentals of digital system components including hardware, software and networks. They are exposed to how computers are connected to form networks. Students have opportunities to create a range of digital solutions to given problems relating to real life scenarios using a broad range of industry used software. Products are completed using the system development cycle to gain a full understanding of all aspects of technology creation. They develop the ability to investigate and analyze current digital technology issues in the media.

Students undertake study in Year 9 Digital Technology through the following units:

Database Theory

  • Define and decompose real-world problems in terms of where software can be used to fulfil specific needs
  • Understand how flat file databases manage and present data
  • Demonstrate skills in manipulating data for a given purpose
  • Critically evaluate how well developed solutions and existing information systems and policies take account of future risks and sustainability

Issue Analysis E-Commerce

  • Investigate and discuss the role of hardware and software in managing, controlling and securing the movement of and access to data on the internet
  • Explore different strategies in place to protect private data

Database Development

  • Use Microsoft Access to create a product
  • Understand how relational databases manage and present data
  • Demonstrate skills in sourcing, creating and manipulating data for a given purpose
  • Create a software solution for a given scenario

Educational Game

  • Use ActionScript to create a final product
  • Demonstrate skills in designing, creating and evaluating a purpose built game

Photoshop Introduction

  • Use Adobe Photoshop to create a final product
  • Demonstrate skills in manipulating images

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Assessment Type 1 Folio (30%)

  • Database theory
  • Issue analysis

Assessment Type 2 Skills & Application (70%)

  • Product design
  • Product creation

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Year 10 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 9 Digital Technology include: Year 10 Information Technology or Year 10 Information Processing and Publishing.

Digital Technology A


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Business Enterprise and Technology

Required Background: Completion of year 8 Digital Technology.

Subject Overview

Students learn the fundamentals of digital system components including hardware, software and networks. They are exposed to how computers are connected to form networks. Students have opportunities to create a range of digital solutions to given problems relating to real life scenarios using a broad range of industry used software. Products are completed using the system development cycle to gain a full understanding of all aspects of technology creation. They develop the ability to investigate and analyze current digital technology issues in the media.

Students undertake study in Year 9 Digital Technology through the following units:

Hardware, Software and Networks

  • Investigate the role of hardware
  • Understand different software and capabilities
  • Explore how data is managed, controlled and secured
  • Develop and understanding of different types of networks and their purposes

Spreadsheet Software

  • Define and decompose real-world problems in terms of where software can be used to fulfil specific needs
  • Use Microsoft Excel to create a product
  • Demonstrate skills in using functions, formulae and formatting
  • Demonstrate skills in manipulating and visualising data
  • Create a final working spreadsheet model for a given scenario

Issue Analysis Social Networking

  • Investigate and discuss possible outcomes of sharing ideas and information online
  • Explore social contexts and legal responsibilities

Graphic Design and Flash Animation

  • Explore the use of graphic images and files extensions
  • Develop awareness of the importance and association of branding
  • Use Adobe Flash and Illustrator to create a final product
  • Demonstrate skills in designing, creating and evaluating a purpose made animation

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Assessment Type 1 Folio (30%)

  • Hardware theory
  • Issue analysis

Assessment Type 2 Skills & Application (70%)

  • Product design
  • Product creation

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Year 10 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 9 Digital Technology include: Year 10 Information Technology or Year 10 Information Processing and Publishing.

Drama B


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Drama

Required Background: Completion of Year 8 Drama

Subject Overview

The aim of Drama is to provide students with experiences in which the intellect, the emotions, the imagination and the body are all involved and developed through expression, performance, observation and reflection. In Drama, students learn about themselves and others by creating characters and situations.  Students are involved physically as well as emotionally and intellectually: the students learn through doing. Drama is, moreover, a co-operative process through which students develop their ability to share and communicate.

Students undertake study in Year 9 Drama through the following topics:

Performance

  • Students are exposed to a variety of different styles of performance this Semester, through:
  • Mime and Mask: Students make their own Greek Theatre Mask designing the facial features to suit a character. They then devise and perform a Mime in their mask.
  • Radio Play: As a whole group students perform a radio play including speaking the lines and producing all the sound effect.

Theory

  • Greek Theatre: Investigation and analysis is undertaken of the history of Greek Theatre and the origin of Masks. This tasks is completed though a series of questions.  
  • Circus unit: Students look into various styles of acting and telling a story, different circus elements are investigated.
  • Review Writing: Students undertaken a review of various filmed performances to develop their skills in critiquing and writing formal reviews.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Performance (40%)

  • Mime and Mask
  • Radio Play

Assessment Type 2 Theory (40%)

  • Review
  • Greek Theatre Questions
  • Circus booklet and analysis 

Assessment Type 3 Workshop (20%)

  • Participation and skills in Workshop activities
  • Learning of lines
  • Participation in rehearsals

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Year 10 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 9 Drama include: Year 10 Drama

Drama A


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Drama

Required Background: Completion of Year 8 Drama

Subject Overview

The aim of Drama is to provide students with experiences in which the intellect, the emotions, the imagination and the body are all involved and developed through expression, performance, observation and reflection. In Drama, students learn about themselves and others by creating characters and situations.  Students are involved physically as well as emotionally and intellectually: the students learn through doing. Drama is, moreover, a co-operative process through which students develop their ability to share and communicate.

Students undertake study in Year 9 Drama through the following topics:

Performance

  • Students will participate in small group performances, developing a variety of skills, through:
  • Film Clip: Students work in small groups and create a film clip / movement routine to music.
  • Small Group Performance: A modern Shakespeare is studied and students participate in a performance based on the Shakespeare play. The play is rehearsed in detail and students are exposed to all aspects of the performance, such as stage craft and backstage roles. The play is performed to a live audience.
  • Workshop: Participation in all workshop activities, rehearsals and class performances is expected. Activities include warm up games and workshop activities related to the rehearsal. 

Theory

  • Types of Theatres and Stages: Students research and investigate different types of theatres and stages.
  • Behind the Scenes Investigation: Students investigate and research behind the scenes of a performance and undertake a focussed oral presentation on Set Design. Where they have designed and created their own stage.
  • Review Writing: Students view live and filmed performances, and learn to critique and write a formal review.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Performance (40%)

  • A Midsummers Night Dream
  • Film clip

Theory (40%)

  • Review
  • Oral Presentation
  • Stage Test
  • Shakespeare questions 
  • Page to stage workbook

Workshop (20%)

  • Participation and skills in Workshop activities
  • Learning of lines
  • Participation in rehearsals

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Year 10 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 9 Drama include: Year 10 Drama

Food and Hospitality B


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Food and Hospitality

Required Background: Successful completion of Year 8 Food and Hospitality

Subject Overview

The Australian Curriculum for Food technology enables students to have had the opportunity to create designed solutions in the following technologies contexts: Food and fibre production and Food specialisations. Students work independently and collaboratively. Students specifically focus on preferred futures, taking into account, environmental and social sustainability factors. Students use creativity, innovation and enterprise skills with increasing confidence, independence and collaboration. Students identify the steps involved in planning the production of designed solutions. They develop detailed management plans incorporating elements such as sequenced time and action plans to manage a range of design tasks safely. They apply management plans, changing direction when necessary, to successfully complete design tasks. Students identify and establish safety procedures that minimise risk with safety and efficiency in mind, maintaining safety standards to ensure success. They learn to transfer theoretical knowledge to practical activities across a range of projects.

Students undertake study in Year 9 Food and Hospitality through the following topics:

Meaty Ideas

  • Hygiene and safety, red meat, chicken, fish and meat preparation. Curried meat and veggie pie, beef stroganoff, chicken and mushroom risotto, lemon chicken, shake and bake chicken, fish and chips

Eating Well for the Future

  • Energy Balance, Glycaemic index, obesity, design process, evaluation. Vegetable lasagne, chicken and vegetable sausage rolls, healthy lunch, lemon meringue tart, chocolate mousse.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Practical (60%)

  • Practical Application
  • Individual Evaluation

Theory (40%)

  • Investigation
  • Assignments

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Year 10 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 9 Food and Hospitality include: Year 10 Food and Hospitality.

Food and Hospitality A


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Food and Hospitality

Required Background: Successful completion of Year 8 Food and Hospitality

Subject Overview

The Australian Curriculum for Food technology enables students to have had the opportunity to create designed solutions in the following technologies contexts: Food and fibre production and Food specialisations. Students work independently and collaboratively. Students specifically focus on preferred futures, taking into account, environmental and social sustainability factors. Students use creativity, innovation and enterprise skills with increasing confidence, independence and collaboration. Students identify the steps involved in planning the production of designed solutions. They develop detailed management plans incorporating elements such as sequenced time and action plans to manage a range of design tasks safely. They apply management plans, changing direction when necessary, to successfully complete design tasks. Students identify and establish safety procedures that minimise risk with safety and efficiency in mind, maintaining safety standards to ensure success. They learn to transfer theoretical knowledge to practical activities across a range of projects.

Students undertake study in Year 9 Food and Hospitality through the following topics:

The Green Grocer

  • Kitchen safety and hygiene, packaging and labelling, vegetables, design process, orange and poppy seed cupcakes, shepherd’s pie, sweet potato parcel, noodle stir-fry

Grains are Great

  • Cereals, wheat, rice, couscous, design process, pasta, red onion focaccia, chicken risotto

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Practical (60%)

  • Practical Application
  • Individual Evaluation

Theory (40%)

  • Investigation
  • Assignments

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Year 10 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 9 Food and Hospitality include: Year 10 Food and Hospitality.

Music B


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Music

Required Background: Students must have successfully completed Year 8 Music.

Subject Overview

In Year 9 Music students make and respond to music independently and in small groups. They explore music as an art form through listening, composing and performing. Students continue to develop their aural skills as they build on their understanding and use of the elements of music. They extend their understanding and use of more complex rhythms and diversity of pitch and incorporate dynamics and expression in different forms. In performance they are developing technical and expressive skills. Students draw on music from a range of cultures, times and locations through contemporary Rock music. They explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements and evaluate performers’ success in expressing the composers’ intentions. Students’ understanding of the roles of artists and audiences builds upon previous experience in Music as students engage with more diverse music.

Students undertake study in Year 9 Music through the following topics:

Musicianship

  • Musicianship enables students to recognise musical concepts both aurally and through notation.

Musical Styles

  • Musical styles teaches students the skills to be able to place musical examples in their stylistic, historical and cultural context.

Music Technology

  • Students continue to develop skills in manipulating music electronically using Mixcraft 7 software.

Solo and Ensemble Performance

  • Students select and rehearse both solo and ensemble repertoire in consultation with their instrumental and class teachers and participate in performances to the class and the wider school community.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Making Music (75%)

  • Solo Performance
  • Ensemble Performance

Responding to Music (25%)

  • Musicianship Test
  • Musical Styles Assignment
  • Music Technology Assignment

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Year 10 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 9 Music include: Music A and B.

Music A


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Music

Required Background: Students must have successfully completed Year 8 Music.

Subject Overview

In Year 9 Music students make and respond to music independently and in small groups. They explore music as an art form through listening, composing and performing. Students continue to develop their aural skills as they build on their understanding and use of the elements of music. They extend their understanding and use of more complex rhythms and diversity of pitch and incorporate dynamics and expression in different forms. In performance they are developing technical and expressive skills. Students draw on music from a range of cultures, times and locations through contemporary Rock music. They explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements and evaluate performers’ success in expressing the composers’ intentions. Students’ understanding of the roles of artists and audiences builds upon previous experience in Music as students engage with more diverse music.

Students undertake study in Year 9 Music through the following topics:

Musicianship

  • Musicianship enables students to recognise musical concepts both aurally and through notation.

Musical Styles

  • Musical styles teaches students the skills to be able to place musical examples in their stylistic, historical and cultural context.

Music Technology

  • Students develop skills in manipulating music electronically using Mixcraft 7 software.

Solo and Ensemble Performance

  • Students select and rehearse both solo and ensemble repertoire in consultation with their instrumental and class teachers and participate in performances to the class and the wider school community.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Making Music (75%)

  • Solo Performance
  • Ensemble Performance

Responding to Music (25%)

  • Musicianship Test
  • Musical Styles Assignment
  • Music Technology Assignment

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Year 10 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 9 Music include: Music A and B.

Note: Students electing to study Music are expected to undertake instrumental tuition (an additional cost) and participate in a College Ensemble Group.

English


(Full Year of Study) Learning Area: English

Subject Overview

English focuses on the exploration and development of English skills through reading, viewing, writing, speaking, and using technology in appropriate ways and for different purposes. There is a strong emphasis on preparing for NAPLAN through analysing and responding to a range of different texts. Students in Year Nine will learn the purpose of using a range of literary techniques and analyse how they are used to persuade an audience. Students independently read a text of their choosing and respond to questions relating to the literary devices used by authors.

Students undertake study in Year 9 English through the following topics:

NAPLAN Preparation

  • Students build on comprehension strategies and respond to and analyse a variety of NAPLAN styled texts, to become a successful reader. Students also develop the skills of persuasive writing through the introduction, deconstruction, and joint construction of an argument. To further the persuasive component, student present their arguments orally to the class.

Film Study

  • Student view a film text and analyse key features of mis-en-scene and cinematic techniques in an analytical response.

Independent Reading

  • Students develop independent critical reading skills by selecting an appropriate novel of their choice, reading and deconstructing the text independently and completing a variety of Journal responses. Student also construct a creative collage to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of their text.

Novel Study

  • Students deepen their understanding of Novel construction through a thorough analysis of a class novel. Students complete a comparative analysis of the text and also produce a memoir utilising literary devices demonstrated through the novel.

Poetry

  • Students explore a range of Australian poems and poets to explore the effect and use of poetic techniques. Students demonstrate their knowledge of the poems through a creative photo story, and analysis of their creative text.

Shakespeare 

  • Students read and explore one of Shakespeare’s most famous plays, Macbeth. Upon a close reading of the play, students will transform a scene into a modern day adaption to demonstrate their understanding of the text.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Analysis (50%)

  • NAPLAN
  • Film Study
  • Independent Reading
  • Novel Study
  • Poetry

Production (50%)

  • NAPLAN
  • Novel Study
  • Poetry
  • Shakespeare

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Year 10 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 9 English include: Year 10 English.

Science


(Full Year of Study) Learning Area: Science

Subject Overview

Semester One
The Australian Curriculum for Science provides students with skills and knowledge across three content strands; Science Inquiry Skills, Science as a Human Endeavour and Science Understanding.  In Year 9, students explore ways in which the human body as a system responds to its external environment. They are introduced to the notion of the atom as a system of protons, electrons and neutrons, and how this system can change through nuclear decay. Students begin to develop an understanding of the conservation of energy and begin to develop a more sophisticated view of energy transfer.

Semester Two
The Australian Curriculum for Science provides students with skills and knowledge across three content strands; Science Inquiry Skills, Science as a Human Endeavour and Science Understanding.  In Year 9, students consider the interdependencies between biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems. They are introduced to the concept that matter can be rearranged through chemical change and that these changes play an important role in many systems. An understanding of conservation of energy is begun and a more sophisticated view of energy transfer is developed. Students are exposed to the concept of energy and forces and how this applies to global systems such as continental movement.

Students undertake study in Year 9 Science through the following topics:

Biological Sciences – Control and Defence

  • Describing the nervous system structure and function, with a focus on brain structure and reflexes.
  • Explaining the endocrine systems and its role in maintaining body temperature and water balance
  • Analysing how body systems work together to perform the many functions of the body.
  • Apply knowledge of body systems to explain how modern technology implants work

Biological Sciences – Ecosystems

  • Understanding the importance of resources in an environment and classifying them as biotic and abiotic
  • Classify interdependent relationships between species as competition, predation, mutualism, parasitism or commensalism.
  • Categorising organism’s adaptations as behavioural, structural or functional.
  • Recalling the equations for photosynthesis and respiration to explain the sun as origin of energy for living organisms
  • Utilising food chains and webs to explain that energy is pass through an ecosystem but that matter is recycled

Chemical Sciences – Atoms and Materials

  • Explaining and labelling the structure of the atom and how it links to an element’s position on the Periodic Table
  • Naming simple covalent and ionic compounds
  • Classifying metals and non-metals based on their properties
  • Utilising knowledge of metals and alloys to design and undertake an investigation

Chemical Sciences – Chemical Reactions

  • Recognising and classifying changes as either physical or chemical due to observations
  • Identifying reactants and products in a chemical reaction and writing word equations
  • Determining the ratio of elements in a given chemical formulae and know common compound formulas
  • Applying the Conservation of Mass theory to balance simple equations
  • Knowing the properties of acids and bases and utilising these to investigate the action of antacids.

Physical Sciences – Energy

  • Explaining and applying the Conservation of Energy theory
  • Describing heat transfer methods of conduction, convection and radiation
  • Explaining that sound is energy that transferred as a wave and understand the properties of a waveform.

Physical Sciences –Electromagnetic Radiation

  • Explaining and applying the Conservation of Energy theory
  • Defining light as energy that travels in the form of an electromagnetic wave and describing how light waves interact with different surfaces.
  • Conducting an investigation into the radiation and absorption of heat

Earth and Space Sciences – Volcanology

  • Describing the process of the formation of volcanoes and explain why and what occurs when a volcano erupts.
  • Apply knowledge of volcanoes and other aspect of Science to analyse a popular film.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Investigations Folio (60%)

  • Practical Investigation
  • Research Investigations
  • Issues Analysis

Skills and Application Tasks (40%)

  • Knowledge Assignments
  • Topic Tests

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Year 10 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 9 Science include: Year 10 Science

Humanities


(Full Year of Study) Learning Area: Humanities

Subject Overview

The humanities and social sciences are the study of human behaviour and interaction in social, cultural, environmental, economic and political contexts. The humanities and social sciences have a historical and contemporary focus, from personal to global contexts, and consider challenges for the future.

In the Australian Curriculum, the Humanities and Social Sciences learning area comprises four subjects: History, Geography, Economics and Business, Civics and Citizenship.

Students undertake study in Year 9 Humanities through the following topics:

HISTORY

Overview

  • The Modern World and Australia 1750 – 1918 CE;
  • Industrial Revolution;
  • Indigenous Communities in Australia;
  • Settlement of Australia by Europeans;
  • Australia and World War One.

Depth Study

  • Industrial Revolution;
  • Mapping the British Empire c1800 CE;
  • Growth of Cities;
  • Changes in the working conditions for men, women and children;
  • Development and spread of innovations.

Depth Study 2

  • Making a Nation – Australia 1788 – 1918 CE;
  • The impact of European settlement on Indigenous people;
  • Impact of the Gold Rushes;
  • Path to Federation;
  • Social Legislation of the new Federal Government.

Depth Study 3

  • Australia and World War One;
  • Australian attitudes to the outbreak of war;
  • Key involvement of Australia – Gallipoli and the Western Front;
  • Impact of the war on Australia at home – Conscription Issue;
  • Ideals associated with the ANZAC Tradition.

GEOGRAPHY 

Biomes and food security

  • The distribution and characteristics of biomes as regions with distinctive climates, soils, vegetation and productivity;
  • The human alteration of biomes and the environmental effects of these alterations;
  • The environmental, economic and technological factors that influence crop yields in Australia and across the world;
  • The challenges to food production, including land and water degradation, shortage of fresh water, competing land uses, and climate change, for Australia and other areas of the world;
  • The capacity of the world’s environments to sustainably feed the projected future population to achieve food security for Australia and the world.

Geographies of interconnections

  • The perceptions people have of place, and how this influences their connections to different places.
  • The way transportation and information and communication technologies are used to connect people to services, information and people in other places.
  • The ways that places and people are interconnected with other places through trade in goods and services, at all scales
  • The effects of the production and consumption of goods on places and environments throughout the world and including a country from North-East Asia
  • The effects of people’s travel, recreational, cultural or leisure choices on places, and the implications for the future of these places
  • Identify how geographical information systems (GIS) might be used to analyse geographical data and make predictions

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Investigations (50%)

  • Research Essays and Tasks
  • Empathy Tasks

Source Analysis (50%)

  • Skill Drills
  • Source Analysis Tasks

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Year 10 study options that are undertaken following successful completion of Year 9 Humanities include: Humanities – History and Geography

Art B


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Art

Required Background: Successful completion of Year 8 Art.

Subject Overview

Visual Art provides students with the skills to evaluate how representations communicate artistic intentions in artworks they make and view. They evaluate artworks and displays from different cultures, times and places. They analyse connections between visual conventions, practices and viewpoints that represent their own and others’ ideas. They identify influences of other artists’ on their own artworks. Students can manipulate materials, techniques and processes to develop and refine techniques and processes to represent ideas and subject matter in their artworks. In Year 9 Art, the areas of learning this semester include: Making and Responding to Art. These areas were studied through the topics: Painting techniques and Aboriginal Art.

Students undertake study in Year 9 Art through the following topics:

Painting Techniques

  • The aim of this unit is to equip students with a high understanding of how to use acrylic paint through eight demonstrated techniques. Students will also learn new skills and knowledge in the use watercolour and water-mixable oil paint through exploration and experimentation through numerous techniques. Students create a final painting using both their choice of media: Acrylics, watercolour or water-mixable oil paints and their choice of subject matter.

Students will also undertake an artist study. Students get to choose either a historical or contemporary artist to complete this theory work on.

Aboriginal Art

  • The aim of this unit is to give students an opportunity to further develop their understanding about Aboriginal Art. Students will evaluate artworks through the study of artists such as Richard Campbell and Lin Onus. Students will experiment with their developing personal style, reflecting on the styles of artists, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and considers different viewpoints. Students will create a landscape through artist influences and then transform the landscape into a 3D sculpture. Students are encouraged to consider if their artwork was made from different material or be produced in a different form, would the meaning of the artwork change?

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Practical (70%)

  • Acrylic painting techniques poster
  • Final painting
  • Landscape painting
  • Landscape sculpture – using found objects

Theory (30%)

  • Painting techniques – Artist study
  • Art analysis of a Richard Campbell artwork

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Year 10 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 9 Art include: Year 10 Art.

Art A


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Art

Required Background: Successful completion of Year 8 Art.

Subject Overview

Visual Art provides students with the skills to evaluate how representations communicate artistic intentions in artworks they make and view. They evaluate artworks and displays from different cultures, times and places. They analyse connections between visual conventions, practices and viewpoints that represent their own and others’ ideas. They identify influences of other artists’ on their own artworks. Students can manipulate materials, techniques and processes to develop and refine techniques and processes to represent ideas and subject matter in their artworks. In Year 9 Art, the areas of learning this semester include: Making and Responding to Art. These areas were studied through the topics: Drawing and Cubism with sculpture.

Students undertake study in Year 9 Art through the following topics:

Drawing

  • The aim of this unit is to give students the opportunity to develop their observation skills and sensory motor skills associated with hand/eye coordination.  Students will understand the mathematical theory of general facial proportions and successfully apply these concepts to their own practical study. Students will have the opportunity to create a blind contour drawing, a continuous line portrait and create a realistic self-portrait using the grid method.

Cubism

  • The aim of this unit is to give students the opportunity to further develop their drawing and sculpture skills. They will recognise works by major artists as well as develop an understanding of the art movement Cubism, Australian brand Mambo and African Masks and their links. Students will research, analyse and report on selected artworks whilst developing their use of composition, art terminology and the elements and principles of art and design.

    Students will then use their self-portrait from the Drawing unit and create a Cubist portrait being inspired by either Pablo Picasso or Georges Braque. Students will able to choose their colour palette and use acrylic paints.

 

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Practical (70%)

  • Grid portrait (self-portrait using graphite)
  • Clay construction – slab
  • Cubist portrait using acrylic paint

Theory (30%)

  • Artist study (Students choose either a Cubist, Mambo artist or African masks)
  • Art Analysis of an Archibald portrait prize artwork

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Year 10 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 9 Art include: Year 10 Art.

Mathematics


(Full Year of Study) Learning Area: Mathematics

Subject Overview

The Australian Curriculum for Mathematics provides students with essential mathematical skills and knowledge across three content strands: Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability, whilst developing the proficiencies of Understanding, Fluency, Problem Solving and Reasoning. The proficiencies reinforce the significance of working mathematically within the content and describe how the content is explored or developed. They provide the language to build in the developmental aspects of the learning of mathematics.
Students undertake study in Year 9 Mathematics through the following topics:

Indices and Scientific Notation

  • Students will apply index laws to numerical expressions with integer indices and express numbers in scientific notation.

Pythagoras and Trigonometry

  • Students will investigate Pythagoras’ Theorem and its application to solving simple problems involving right-angled triangles. They will use similarity to investigate the constancy of sine, cosine and tangent ratios for a given angle in right angled-triangles. Students will apply trigonometry to solve right-angled triangle problems.

Money and Financial Maths

  • Students will solve problems involving simple interest.

Measurement

  • Students will calculate the area of composite shapes. They will calculate the surface area and volume of cylinders and solve related problems. Students will solve problems involving the surface area and volume of right prisms. They will investigate very small and very large time scales and intervals.

Real Numbers

  • Students will solve problems involving direct proportion. They will explore the relationship between graphs and equations corresponding to simple rate problems.

Algebraic Expansion

  • Students will apply the distributive law to the expansion of algebraic expressions, including binomials, and collect like terms where appropriate.

Linear and Non-Linear Relationships

  • Students will find the distance between two points located on a Cartesian plane using a range of strategies, including graphing software. They will find the midpoint and gradient of a line segment (interval) on the Cartesian plane using a range of strategies, including graphing software. Students will sketch linear graphs using the coordinates of two points and solve linear equations. They will graph simple non-linear relations with and without the use of digital technologies and solve simple related equations.

Chance

  • Students will list all outcomes for two-step chance experiments, both with and without replacement using tree diagrams or arrays. The will assign probabilities to outcomes and determine probabilities for events. They will calculate relative frequencies from given or collected data to estimate probabilities of events involving ‘and’ or ‘or’. Students will investigate reports of surveys in digital media and elsewhere for information of how data were obtained to estimate population means and medians.

Geometric Reasoning

  • Students will use the enlargement transformation to explain similarity and develop the conditions for triangles to be similar. The will solve problems using ratio and scale factors in similar figures.

Data Representation

  • Students will identify everyday questions and issues involving at least one numerical and at least one categorical variable, and collect data directly from secondary sources. The will construct back-to-back stem-and-leaf plots and histograms and describe data, using the terms ‘skewed’, ‘symmetric’ and ‘bi-modal’. Students will compare data displays using mean, median and range to describe and interpret numerical data sets in terms of location (centre) and spread.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Skills and Application Tasks (80%)

  • Students undertake at least four skills and application tasks in the form of topic tests.

Mathematical Investigations (20%)

  • Students will undertake at least two folio investigations. Students are required to investigate mathematical relationships, concepts, or problems, which may be set in an applied context.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Year 10 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 9 Mathematics include: 10 General Mathematics, 10 Mathematical Methods and 10 Specialist Mathematics.

Religious Education


(Full Year of Study) Learning Area: Humanities

Subject Overview

The Crossways and RAVE Religious Education programmes provide students with knowledge across 8 strands: Believing, Living, Celebrating, Textual, World Religions, Philosophy of Religion, Values and Ethics and Silence & Stillness.  These allow students to explore and develop their own faith as well as growing in their understanding of the faith of others.  In Year 9 RE, the areas of learning include: The Seven Sacraments, The Holy Spirt, Pentecostalism, Youth and Faith, Biblical Studies, Forgiveness, Rites of Passage and Philosophy of Religion.

Students undertake study in Religious Education through the following topics:

The Seven Sacraments

  • Students explore ways in which the Church helps people become aware of the presence of God in their lives through special rituals and celebrations which we call Sacraments. The students reflect on the concept of Christ as the first Sacrament of God before outlining the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church.  The differences between the Anglican and Catholic understanding of sacraments are discussed. The nature, purpose, and meaning of Sacramentals are explored.

The Holy Spirit

  • Students will develop their understanding of the Seven Sacraments further by examining the role of the Holy Spirit.  Study will focus on the concept of the Trinity and the beliefs expressed in the Apostles’ Creed.

Youth and Faith

  • Students will investigate the concept of ‘Spirituality’.  They will build on their understanding of spirituality by examining what faith looks like today for the younger generation.  Students will conduct primary research, as well as investigate secondary sources (such as the census) to assist them in drawing conclusions.  Their investigation will lay the foundation for designing and presenting their own liturgy.

Biblical Studies

  • Students will gain an understanding of the purpose and content of the Bible.  Through investigation they will understand the different genre of material found in the Bible. Their learning will be developed further by the application of exegetical skills to reflect on different literary types.

Forgiveness

  • Students will critically reflect on faith as a personal and communal response to the human search for meaning and purpose in the context of a world that is both sinful and graced.  They will understand the Christian teachings on forgiveness and explain how and why they are often contradictory to society’s response. Students will reflect on their own lives and where they may be needing to forgive someone else.

Rites of Passage: Coming of Age Ceremonies

  • Students will gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of religious events, beliefs and practices through the study of Rites of Passage (coming of age ceremonies).  Study will focus on three of the main world religions. Students will assess the importance of Rites of Passage (coming of age ceremonies) for individuals and the faith community. 

Philosophy of Religion

  • Students will investigate questions regarding religion, including the nature and existence of God.  They will examine religious experience, analysing religious vocabulary and texts. Study will explore topics such as God’s existence, the relationship between religion and science (cosmological argument) and the problem of evil.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Practical (35%)

  • Create a complex symbol for or image of the Holy Spirit that illustrates the role the Holy Spirit plays in the life of Christians
  • Prepare and present a Prayer Service/Liturgy for the class
  • Plan a secular coming of age ceremony.
  • Prepare and present a discussion addressing the issue of whether God exists

Research (35%)

  • Research and produce a booklet educating a new Christian on the Seven Sacraments.
  • Gospel Exegesis

Reflection (30%)

  • Essay exploring the nature of the Pentecostal Church, focusing in particular on Hillsong Church in Australia and its appeal.
  • Forgiveness Group Presentation

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Year 10 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Religious Education include: Religious Education

Digital Technology B


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Business Enterprise and Technology

Required Background: Completion of Year 9 Digital Technology.

Subject Overview

Students learn the fundamentals of digital system components including hardware, software and networks. They are exposed to how computers are connected to form networks. Students have opportunities to create a range of digital solutions to given problems relating to real life scenarios using a broad range of industry used software. Products are completed using the system development cycle to gain a full understanding of all aspects of technology creation. They develop the ability to investigate and analyze current digital technology issues in the media.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Digital Technology through the following units:

Past and Future Technology

  • Investigate the role that past technology has made on shaping current technologies
  • Demonstrate understanding of technology use in daily routines of the past and present
  • Define and decompose real-world problems in terms of where technology can be used to fulfil specific needs
  • Critically evaluate how technology in the future will impact societies and take into account future risks and sustainability

Issue Analysis E-Waste

  • Investigate and discuss the nature and impact of e-waste within society
  • Explore different strategies in place to prevent negative impacts and provide solutions

Flash Programming Skills

  • Use ActionScript to design programming solutions to problems
  • Understand how test data is input, processed and output in simple and complex algorithms
  • Demonstrate skills in sourcing, creating and manipulating data for a given purpose
  • Demonstrate skills in designing, creating and evaluating a purpose built game

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Assessment Type 1 Folio (30%)

  • Technology theory
  • Issue analysis

Assessment Type 2 Skills & Application (70%)

  • Product design
  • Product creation

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Year 11 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Digital Technology include: Year 11 Information Technology or Information Processing and Publishing.

Digital Technology A


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Business Enterprise and Technology

Required Background: Completion of Year 9 Digital Technology.

Subject Overview

Students learn the fundamentals of digital system components including hardware, software and networks. They are exposed to how computers are connected to form networks. Students have opportunities to create a range of digital solutions to given problems relating to real life scenarios using a broad range of industry used software. Products are completed using the system development cycle to gain a full understanding of all aspects of technology creation. They develop the ability to investigate and analyze current digital technology issues in the media.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Digital Technology through the following units:
Hardware, Software and Networks:

  • Investigate the role of hardware
  • Understand different software and capabilities
  • Explore how data is managed, controlled and secured
  • Develop and understanding of different types of networks and their purposes

Database Theory

  • Define and decompose real-world problems in terms of where software can be used to fulfil specific needs
  • Understand how flat file databases manage and present data
  • Demonstrate skills in manipulating data for a given purpose
  • Critically evaluate how well developed solutions and existing information systems and policies take account of future risks and sustainability

Issue Analysis Technology Privacy and Security

  • Investigate and discuss implications that new technology have on people’s privacy and security
  • Explore social contexts and legal responsibilities

Database Development

  • Use Microsoft Access to create a product
  • Understand how relational databases manage and present data
  • Demonstrate skills in sourcing, creating and manipulating data for a given purpose
  • Create a software solution for a given scenario

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Assessment Type 1 Folio (30%)

  • Hardware and Software theory
  • Issue analysis

Assessment Type 2 Skills & Application (70%)

  • Product design
  • Product creation

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Year 11 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Digital Technology include: Year 11 Information Technology or Information Processing and Publishing.

Material Products B


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Business Enterprise and Technology

Required Background: Completion of Year 9 Design & Technology.

Subject Overview

Students demonstrate their design and technological ability through activities in contexts that have a practical outcome. They develop the ability to initiate, create and develop products in response to a design brief and evaluate the process and final product. Based on their understanding of the physical properties and working characteristics of materials, students are given opportunities to make sound decisions about material choice. They develop skills and techniques to competently use tools and materials safely. Students analyse the impacts of technology on individuals and the environment related to their product material. Projects are designed using industry standard CAD software.
Students have opportunity to create 3D printed designs. The materials include Wood and Metal, while the processes include Electronics, joint construction, soldering, braze and spot-welding and fabrication.

Students will focus on either a Wood or Metal based unit per semester.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Design & Technology through the following units:

Computer Aided Design (CAD)

Students use an industry standard CAD application to produce diagrams that are applied to the production of a project.

Students will be required to complete:

  • Basic 2D computer-generated graphics;
  • 3D modelling;
  • Assembly, presentation and animated drawings.

Metalwork

Students produce a set project and welding practice pieces. Students then design, construct and evaluate a small metal project. Processes and skills to be learned include:

  • Oxy/acetylene welding - Fusion and Braze;
  • Gas Metal Arc Welding (MIG Welding);
  • Cutting bending and fabricating metal.

Woodwork

Students construct a set project to develop skills. Secondly they design, make and evaluate a solid timber and/or manufactured timber product. Processes and skills to be learned include:

  • Use of a compound mitre saw, router and router table;
  • Use of widening joints, e.g. Biscuit;
  • Cutting rebate, housing, mitre and dowel joints;
  • Staining and spraying equipment.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Folio (30%)

  • Journal entries
  • Safety research,
  • Product design
  • Product evaluation

Skills & Application (70%)

  • Joint construction
  • Project construction
  • Safe work practices

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Year 11 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Design & Technology include: Year 11 Material Products

Material Products A


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Business Enterprise and Technology

Required Background: Completion of Year 9 Design & Technology.

Subject Overview

Students demonstrate their design and technological ability through activities in contexts that have a practical outcome. They develop the ability to initiate, create and develop products in response to a design brief and evaluate the process and final product. Based on their understanding of the physical properties and working characteristics of materials, students are given opportunities to make sound decisions about material choice. They develop skills and techniques to competently use tools and materials safely. Students analyse the impacts of technology on individuals and the environment related to their product material. Projects are designed using industry standard CAD software.
Students have opportunity to create 3D printed designs. The materials include Wood and Metal, while the processes include Electronics, joint construction, soldering, braze and spot-welding and fabrication.

Students will focus on either a Wood or Metal based unit per semester.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Design & Technology through the following units:

Computer Aided Design (CAD)
Students use an industry standard CAD application to produce diagrams that are applied to the production of a project.

Students will be required to complete:

  • Basic 2D computer-generated graphics;
  • 3D modelling;
  • Assembly, presentation and animated drawings.

Metalwork

Students produce a set project and welding practice pieces. Students then design, construct and evaluate a small metal project. Processes and skills to be learned include:

  • Oxy/acetylene welding - Fusion and Braze;
  • Gas Metal Arc Welding (MIG Welding);
  • Cutting bending and fabricating metal.

Woodwork
Students construct a set project to develop skills. Secondly they design, make and evaluate a solid timber and/or manufactured timber product. Processes and skills to be learned include:

  • Use of a compound mitre saw, router and router table;
  • Use of widening joints, e.g. Biscuit;
  • Cutting rebate, housing, mitre and dowel joints;
  • Staining and spraying equipment.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Folio (30%)

  • Journal entries
  • Safety research,
  • Product design
  • Product evaluation

Skills & Application (70%)

  • Joint construction
  • project construction
  • Safe work practices

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Year 11 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Design & Technology include: Year 11 Material Products.

Indonesian B


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Languages

Required Background: Successful completion of Year 9 Indonesian.

Subject Overview

The Australian Curriculum for Indonesian is built around two interrelated strands of Communicating and Understanding. Learners interact using Indonesian in classroom routines and communicative tasks. Learners engage with a range of texts in Indonesian. They participate individually and in groups in tasks and experiences. They participate in presentations, conversations, narration and interviews, sometimes with preparation and sometimes spontaneously. Learners acquire skills in analysing and translating increasingly complex texts, such as emails, recipes, poems, articles and songs. They use modelled language to write for personal and public purposes, such as journal entries, emails, blogs, scripts, and notes for a speech or debate. Learners extend their grammatical knowledge and metalanguage while beginning to explore important features of Indonesian such as register and object-focus construction. They consider connections between language and culture and make comparisons with their own language and culture. They consider language variation, including through exposure to colloquial language and language in context.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Indonesian through the following concepts:

Nutrisi: Are we what we eat?

  • What is good nutrition and what are the food groups?
  • What and how do we cook?
  • How do we eat sustainably?

Cerita: How do we tell stories?

  • How do we tell stories?
  • How do we tell new stories and connect the old with the new?

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Communicating (50%)

  • Oral Interaction
  • Text Production
  • Tests

Understanding Language and Culture (50%)

  • Text Analysis – Listening and Responding
  • Text Analysis – Reading and Responding
  • Reflection in English
  • Tests

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 1 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Indonesian include: Stage 1 Indonesian (continuers).

Indonesian A


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Languages

Required Background: Successful completion of Year 9 Indonesian.

Subject Overview

The Australian Curriculum for Indonesian is built around two interrelated strands of Communicating and Understanding. Learners interact using Indonesian in classroom routines and communicative tasks. Learners engage with a range of texts in Indonesian. They participate individually and in groups in tasks and experiences. They participate in presentations, conversations, narration and interviews, sometimes with preparation and sometimes spontaneously. Learners acquire skills in analysing and translating increasingly complex texts, such as emails, recipes, poems, articles and songs. They use modelled language to write for personal and public purposes, such as journal entries, emails, blogs, scripts, and notes for a speech or debate. Learners extend their grammatical knowledge and metalanguage while beginning to explore important features of Indonesian such as register and object-focus construction. They consider connections between language and culture and make comparisons with their own language and culture. They consider language variation, including through exposure to colloquial language and language in context.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Indonesian through the following concepts:

Lingkungan: How do we care for our environment?

  • How do we describe climate, weather and seasons?
  • How do we cope with natural disasters?
  • How do we act for sustainability?

Impian: What are our hopes and dreams?

  • What are our hopes and dreams?
  • What are the hopes and dreams of world leaders?
  • How do I find my voice in life?

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Communicating (50%)

  • Oral Interaction
  • Text Production
  • Tests

Understanding Language and Culture (50%)

  • Text Analysis – Listening and Responding
  • Text Analysis – Reading and Responding
  • Reflection in English
  • Tests

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 1 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Indonesian include: Indonesian (continuers).

Drama B


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Drama

Required Background: Successful completion of a least one semester of Year 9 Drama.

Subject Overview

Drama allows students to learn through active involvement and they develop creative and powerful ways of expressing themselves. Students are given the opportunity to respond to, reflect on and analyse arts works so they develop a critical appreciation of their own works and those of others.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Drama through the following topics:

Performance

  • Monologue performance: Students select and devise a script of their choice, develop and character and a setting, and then perform their piece.
  • Small group production: Students audition for an on stage role, then create and develop a realistic character performing with the group in front of a small audience.
  • Backstage role for Senior Production: Students work on the Year 12 production undertaking an off stage role. Their participation also allows them to gain a clear understanding of the expectation on Stage 2 Drama.

Written

  • ‘Page to Stage’ Presentation: Students select a production of their choice and as the Director design all the elements for this production, including set/costume designs and publicity. They then deliver their ideas in an oral presentation.
  • Live Performance Reviews: Students view recorded and live performances to develop their skills in critiquing and writing formal reviews.
  • Production Report: After the completion of the class production, students write a reflection on the process and analyse the performance.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Making Drama (50%)

  • Monologue Performance
  • Small Group Performance
  • Backstage role in Year 12 Production

Responding to Drama (50%)

  • Review
  • Page to Stage Presentation
  • Production report

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 1 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Drama include: Stage One Drama.

Drama A


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Drama

Required Background: Successful completion of a least one semester of Year 9 Drama.

Subject Overview

Drama allows students to learn through active involvement and they develop creative and powerful ways of expressing themselves. Students are given the opportunity to respond to, reflect on and analyse arts works so they develop a critical appreciation of their own works and those of others.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Drama through the following topics:

Performance

  • Large group performance: Students audition for an on stage role, then create and develop a realistic character performing with the group in front of a large audience.
  • Individual performance: Students write and deliver a creative poem, in a performance setting, considering characterisation and setting.

Written

  • History of Theatre: After study in class, students undertake an oral presentation investigating the era of the theatre they find the most interesting
  • Live Performance Reviews: Students view a live performance to develop their skills in critiquing and writing formal reviews.
  • Production Report: After the completion of the class production, students write a reflection on the process and analyse their performance.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Making Drama (50%)

  • Large group performance
  • Writing and delivering poem

Responding to Drama (50%)

  • Review
  • History of theatre Oral Presentation
  • Production Report

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 1 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Drama include: Stage One Drama.

Food and Hospitality B


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Food and Hospitality

Required Background: Successful completion of Year 9 Food and Hospitality.

Subject Overview

The Australian Curriculum for Food technology enables students to have had the opportunity to create designed solutions in the following technologies contexts: Food and fibre production and Food specialisations. Students work independently and collaboratively. Students specifically focus on preferred futures, taking into account environmental and social sustainability factors. Students use creativity, innovation and enterprise skills with increasing confidence, independence and collaboration. Students identify the steps involved in planning the production of designed solutions. They develop detailed management plans incorporating elements such as sequenced time and action plans to manage a range of design tasks safely. They apply management plans, changing direction when necessary, to successfully complete design tasks. Students identify and establish safety procedures that minimise risk with safety and efficiency in mind, maintaining safety standards to ensure success. They learn to transfer theoretical knowledge to practical activities across a range of projects.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Food and Hospitality through the following topics:

Catering

  • Front of House and Back of House roles, first course, main and dessert, action plan, individual evaluation, menu selection.

Nutrition for Special Dietary Requirements

  • Diabetic, Celiac (gluten), Osteoporosis, Vegan, High Cholesterol, Lactose Intolerant, Iron deficiency, Pregnancy and pre-natal, sports nutrition, noodle stir-fry, potato gnocchi, ravioli, vegetarian dumplings, red lentil curry, investigation.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Practical (50%)

  • Practical Application
  • Individual Evaluation Report
  • Action Plan

Theory (50%)

  • Investigation
  • Assignments

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 1 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Food and Hospitality include: Stage 1 Food and Hospitality and Stage 1 Child Studies.

Food and Hospitality A


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Food and Hospitality

Required Background: Successful completion of Year 9 Food and Hospitality.

Subject Overview

The Australian Curriculum for Food technology enables students to have had the opportunity to create designed solutions in the following technologies contexts: Food and fibre production and Food specialisations. Students work independently and collaboratively. Students specifically focus on preferred futures, taking into account environmental and social sustainability factors. Students use creativity, innovation and enterprise skills with increasing confidence, independence and collaboration. Students identify the steps involved in planning the production of designed solutions. They develop detailed management plans incorporating elements such as sequenced time and action plans to manage a range of design tasks safely. They apply management plans, changing direction when necessary, to successfully complete design tasks. Students identify and establish safety procedures that minimise risk with safety and efficiency in mind, maintaining safety standards to ensure success. They learn to transfer theoretical knowledge to practical activities across a range of projects.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Food and Hospitality through the following topics:

Cultural Food

  • Common ingredients used in everyday cooking. Analyse common cooking practises or eating rituals/traditions, Kangaroo Steak sandwich, Cornish Pasty, Thai Green Curry, Vietnamese Spring Rolls, Sushi

Nutrition

  • Nutrients, Carbohydrates, Lipids, Protein, Water, Vitamin and Mineral. Classification of nutrients into Macro and Micro, Digestion -Mechanical and Chemical. Basil and Pumpkin Risotto, Zucchini Slice, Carrot Cake, Profiteroles and Custard, Chicken Pie

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Practical (50%)

  • Practical Application
  • Individual Evaluation Report
  • Action Plan

Theory (50%)

  • Investigation
  • Assignments

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 1 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Food and Hospitality include: Stage 1 Food and Hospitality and Stage 1 Child Studies.

Physical Education B


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Health and Physical Education

Required Background: Successful completion of Year 9 Physical Education.

Subject Overview

The Australian Curriculum for Health and Physical Education supports students to apply health and physical activity information to devise and implement personalised plans for maintaining healthy and active habits. They also experience different roles that contribute to successful participation in physical activity, and propose strategies to support the development of preventive health practices that build and optimise community health and wellbeing. Students learn to apply more specialised movement skills and complex movement strategies and concepts in different movement environments. They also explore movement concepts and strategies to evaluate and refine their own and others’ movement performances. The curriculum also provides opportunities for students to refine and consolidate personal and social skills in demonstrating leadership, teamwork and collaboration in a range of physical activities.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Physical Education through the following topics:

Golf

  • Driving, chipping, putting, etiquette, application of skills on a golf course

Touch Football

  • Passing, roll ball, rucking sequence, tactical manoeuvres (switches and wraps)

Coaching

  • Develop and apply their coaching skills, plan and apply session for peers

Skill Acquisition

  • Stages of learning a skill, elements of a skillful performer

Skeletal and Muscular Systems

  • Bones, muscles, joints, anatomical movements

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Practical (50%)

  • Practical Skills and Application
  • Initiative and collaboration

Possible topics include-Golf, Coaching and Touch Football

Folio (50%)

  • Topic tests
  • Integrated tasks (assignments)

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 1 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Physical Education include: Stage 1 Physical Education and/or Stage 1 Sports Studies.

Physical Education A


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Health and Physical Education

Required Background: Successful completion of Year 9 Physical Education.

Subject Overview

The Australian Curriculum for Health and Physical Education supports students to apply health and physical activity information to devise and implement personalised plans for maintaining healthy and active habits. They also experience different roles that contribute to successful participation in physical activity, and propose strategies to support the development of preventive health practices that build and optimise community health and wellbeing. Students learn to apply more specialised movement skills and complex movement strategies and concepts in different movement environments. They also explore movement concepts and strategies to evaluate and refine their own and others’ movement performances. The curriculum also provides opportunities for students to refine and consolidate personal and social skills in demonstrating leadership, teamwork and collaboration in a range of physical activities.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Physical Education through the following topics:

SEPEP

  • Sport Education in Physical Education Program, leadership, interpersonal skills, program which mirrors “real life” sport

Archery

  • Stringing bow, safety, stance, draw, scoring

Heart Rate

  • Heart Rate monitors, pulse, heart rate, effects of exercise on the body

Energy Systems

  • ATP, sources of nutrients, Aerobic and Anaerobic Energy production, contribution of energy Systems for specific activities

Training Methods and Principles

  • What are the different training methods and how do we apply them for a specific sport/training session

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Practical (50%)

  • Practical Skills and Application
  • Initiative and collaboration

Possible topics include-Archery, Touch Football, Heart Rate, SEPEP

Folio (50%)

  • Topic tests
  • Integrated tasks ( assignments)

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 1 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Physical Education include: Stage 1 Physical Education and/or Stage 1 Sports Studies.

Music B


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Music

Required Background: Students must have completed Music A in year 10 accompanied by instrumental tuition.

Subject Overview

In Year 10 Music students make and respond to music independently and in small groups. They explore music as an art form through listening, composing and performing. Students continue to develop their aural skills as they build on their understanding and use of the elements of music. They continue to extend their understanding and use of more complex rhythms and diversity of pitch and incorporate dynamics and expression in different forms. In performance they are further developing technical and expressive skills. Students draw on music from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements and evaluate performers’ success in expressing the composers’ intentions. Students’ understanding of the roles of artists and audiences builds upon previous experience in Music as students engage with more diverse music.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Music through the following topics:

Musicianship

  • Musicianship enables students to recognise musical concepts both aurally and through notation.

Musical Styles

  • Musical Styles teaches students the skills to be able to place musical examples in their stylistic, historical and cultural context.

Composition

  • Students will further develop their skills in composition.

Solo and Ensemble Performance

  • Students select and rehearse both solo and ensemble repertoire in consultation with their instrumental and class teachers and participate in performances to the class and the wider school community.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Making Music (75%)

  • Solo Performance
  • Ensemble Performance

Responding to Music (25%)

  • Musicianship Test
  • Musical Styles Research Assignment
  • Composition

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 1 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Music include: Stage 1 Music. Note: Students electing to study Music are expected to undertake individual instrumental tuition and participate in a College Ensemble Group.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Music include: a range of units within Stage 2 Music.

Music A


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Music

Required Background: Required Background

Students must have completed at least one semester of music in Year 9 accompanied by instrumental tuition.

Subject Overview

In Year 10 Music students make and respond to music independently and in small groups. They explore music as an art form through listening, composing and performing. Students continue to develop their aural skills as they build on their understanding and use of the elements of music. They continue to extend their understanding and use of more complex rhythms and diversity of pitch and incorporate dynamics and expression in different forms. In performance they are further developing technical and expressive skills. Students draw on music from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements and evaluate performers’ success in expressing the composers’ intentions. Students’ understanding of the roles of artists and audiences builds upon previous experience in Music as students engage with more diverse music.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Music through the following topics:

Musicianship

  • Musicianship enables students to recognise musical concepts both aurally and through notation.

Musical Styles

  • Musical Styles teaches students the skills to be able to place musical examples in their stylistic, historical and cultural context.

Arranging

  • Students develop skills in arranging and publishing music for a variety of musical instruments using Sibelius software.

Solo and Ensemble Performance

  • Students select and rehearse both solo and ensemble repertoire in consultation with their instrumental and class teachers and participate in performances to the class and the wider school community.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Making Music (75%)

  • Solo Performance
  • Ensemble Performance

Responding to Music (25%)

  • Musicianship Test
  • Big Bang inspired Research Assignment
  • Arrangement

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 1 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Music include: Stage 1 Music.

Note: Students electing to study Music are expected to undertake individual instrumental tuition and participate in a College Ensemble Group.

English


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: English

Subject Overview

Subjects in the English Learning Area have a common focus on the exploration and development of English skills through reading, viewing, writing, composing, listening, speaking, and using information and communication technologies in appropriate ways and for different purposes.

Students undertake study in Year 10 English through the following topics:

Novel Study

  • Students read a class novel and explore key literary techniques and themes expressed by the author. Students demonstrate their understanding of the text through analytical writing. 

Persuasive Speaking

  • Students create a persuasive speech on a topic of their choice, and present their arguments to the class in the form of an oral speech.

Film Study

  • Students explore the Thriller genre through viewing and analysing a film. Student analyse key cinematic techniques used by the director to achieve a particular effect.

Narrative Writing

  • Students create a narrative, demonstrating their knowledge of the Thriller genre. Orientation, Rising Tension, Climax, and Resolution are all evaluated in the construction of their story.

Recount Writing

  • Students create a recount on an important life event, demonstrating their ability to write creatively and for a particular purpose.

Independent Reading

  • Student select a novel of their choice and complete a variety of tasks independently. Written responses, Creative pieces, and Oral analysis encompass the Independent Reading tasks.

Critical Reading Test

  • Students analyse a range of short texts and reflect on the relationship between audience, purpose, and form. Students explain the connection between these elements and the stylistic features of the texts under test conditions.

Shakespeare

  • Students read and explore one of Shakespeare’s most famous tragedies, Romeo & Juliet. Upon a close reading of the play, students will examine key monologues and soliloquies and analyse their importance within the play.

Poetry

  • Students explore a range of Love poems, from various poets. Through a comparative analysis, students will examine poetic form and techniques to convey particular emotions.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Text Analysis (50%)

  • Novel Study
  • Film Study
  • Critical Reading
  • Shakespeare
  • Poetry

Text Production (50%)

  • Persuasive Speaking
  • Narrative Writing
  • Recount Writing
  • Independent Reading

This subject does include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 1 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 English include: English Literary Studies; English; Essential English.

Science


(Full year of Study) Learning Area: Science

Subject Overview

The Australian Curriculum for Science provides students with the essential skills and knowledge across three strands: Science and Understanding, Science and Inquiry Skills and Science as a Human Endeavour. The three strands are interrelated their content is taught in an integrated way.

In the Year 10 Science curriculum students explore systems at different scales and connect microscopic and macroscopic properties to explain the world around us. Students explore the biological, chemical, geological and physical evidence for different theories, such as the theories of natural selection and the Big Bang. Atomic theory is developed to understand relationships within the periodic table. Understanding motion and forces are related by applying physical laws. Relationships between aspects of the living, physical and chemical world are applied to systems on a local and global scale and this enables students to predict how changes will affect these systems.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Science through the following topics:

Biological Sciences – DNA and Genetics

  • The structure of DNA and its role in determining and controlling the characteristics of organisms
  • Mendel’s work with pea plants in discovering the inheritance of characteristics from parents
  • Patterns of inheritance of dominant / recessive and sex-linked characteristics through generations

Biological Sciences – Natural Selection and Evolution

  • The structure of DNA and its role in determining and controlling the characteristics of organisms
  • Mendel’s work with pea plants in discovering the inheritance of characteristics from parents
  • Patterns of inheritance of dominant / recessive and sex-linked characteristics through generations

Chemical Sciences – The Periodic Table and Trends

  • How the atomic structure and properties of elements is used to organise the Periodic Table
  • Electron structures of atoms and explanation of properties.
  • How the metal activity series explains the properties of metals

Chemical Sciences – Chemical Reactions

  • The use of words and symbol equations to represent reaction
  • Predicting products of chemical reactions
  • Effect of temperature, surface area, concentration and agitation and catalysts on the rate of reaction

Physical Sciences – Motion

  • Describing the motion of objects, linear
  • Forming predictions using the laws of Physics, with a focus on Newton’s Laws
  • Undertaking mathematical modelling to describe and predict motion and the interactions between objects

Physical Sciences – Energy

  • Applying the Law of Conservation of Energy
  • Understand energy transfers and transformations
  • Undertaking mathematical modelling to describe and predict motion and the energy of objects

Earth and Space Sciences – Cycles in Nature

  • Global systems and cycles and interactions involving the biosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere;
  • The impact of human activity on natural systems, with a focus on the carbon cycle;
  • The effect of climate change and the enhanced greenhouse effect on ecosystem.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Investigations Folio (60%)

  • Practical Investigation
  • Research Investigations
  • Issues Analysis

Skills and Application Tasks  (40%)

  • Knowledge Assignments
  • Topic Tests

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 1 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Science include: Stage 1 Biology, Stage 1 Chemistry, Stage 1 Physics and/or Stage 1 Scientific Studies.

Humanities


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Humanities

Subject Overview

The humanities and social sciences are the study of human behaviour and interaction in social, cultural, environmental, economic and political contexts. The humanities and social sciences have a historical and contemporary focus, from personal to global contexts, and consider challenges for the future.

In the Australian Curriculum, the Humanities and Social Sciences learning area comprises four subjects: History, Geography, Economics and Business, Civics and Citizenship.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Humanities through the following topics:
History

Overview

  • The Modern World and Australia;
  • Treaty of Versailles;
  • Roaring Twenties & the Great Depression;
  • Australia, the United Nations & the Cold War;
  • Developments in Technology.

Depth Study

  • World War II (1939 - 1945);
  • Pre-war Europe;
  • WW II in Europe & the Pacific;
  • The Holocaust;
  • Impact of World War 2 on Australia.

Depth Study 2

  • Rights and Freedoms (1945 - Present);
  • Universal Declaration of Human Rights;
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples struggle for rights and freedom;
  • Civil Rights activists;
  • Present Issues e.g. Education / health.

Depth Study 3

  • Popular Culture (1954 - Present);
  • Australian Sport;
  • America’s cultural influence on Australia since 1956;
  • Comparing the American & Asian influences on Australian culture;
  • The contributions of the Australian rock ‘n’ roll, film and television industries on Australian culture and identity.

Geography

  • Measuring and mapping wellbeing and development;
  • Spatial variations in wellbeing between countries;
  • The issues affecting the development of places and their impact on human wellbeing;
  • The reasons for and consequences of spatial variations in human wellbeing in Australia at the local scale;
  • The role of international and national government and non-government organisation.
  • Environment Change and Management
  • The human-induced environmental changes that challenges sustainability.
  • The environmental worldviews of people and their implications for environmental management.
  • The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ approaches to custodial responsibility and environmental management
  • Focus topic:  Coastal areas.  Understanding change and management within the coastal zone.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Investigations (50%)

  • Research Essays and Tasks
  • Empathy Tasks
  • Practical Tasks

Source Analysis (50%)

  • Source Analysis Tasks
  • Tests

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 1 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Humanities include: History, Geography, Society and Culture and Tourism.

Personal Learning Plan (PLP)


(Half Year of Study) Learning Area: Cross Disciplinary Studies

This is a compulsory SACE requirement.  At least a ‘C’ grade needs to be met as part of SACE completion.

Subject Overview

The Personal Learning Plan (PLP) helps students to: plan their personal and learning goals for the future and make informed decisions about their personal development, education, and training.  Developing goals for the future will engage students in activities such as: selecting subjects, courses, and other learning relevant to pathways through and beyond school, investigating possible career choices and exploring personal and learning goals. 

Students undertake study in Year 10 Personal Learning Plan (Stage 1) through the following topics:

Folio Task 1 - Steps to Success

  • Students perform a series of activities and undertake a range of tasks which help them to analyse and learn how they learn best. The activities indicate what subjects best suit them, from which they begin to investigate what careers their best subjects are suited to.  Students establish an action plan for their career goals.

Folio Task 2 - Goal Setting: Chasing your Dreams

  • Task 2 allows students to set SMART goals relating to their personal, learning and career goals.  Students link their goals to the PLP capabilities and they discuss strategies to help them meet their goals.  Students also look a possible hazards and challenges that might face when achieving these goals and they discuss how they plan to overcome these.

Folio Task 3 - Developing your Capabilities

  • After analysing all the capabilities, students are required to select one and develop a plan for how to further develop this capability in their life. They will undertake activities that will demonstrate the application of their chosen capability and keep evidence from Assessment Type: Folio. Students will need to keep evidence of the seven capabilities, research of chosen capability, planning and relevance.

Review - Review the Learning

  • Students have collected a range of evidence, in a variety of formats related to Assessment Type 1: Folio.  Students must be able to identify the capabilities they have developed, the goals they have set and achieved and the relevance of their PLP learning to their future.

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of one 10-credit unit. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Folio (75%)

Students produce three pieces of evidence for assessment of the folio. This evidence may take a variety of forms, such as:

  • A plan, A flowchart, a diary, an electronic portfolio, interview or discussion notes or records

Reflection (25%)

Students produce at least one piece of evidence for assessment of the review. This evidence may take a variety of forms, such as:

  • An oral presentation, a multimedia presentation, a round-table discussion, a notebook, a personal web page.

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

Art B


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Visual Art

Required Background: Completion of Year 9 Art

Subject Overview

Visual Art provides students with the skills to evaluate how representations communicate artistic intentions in artworks they make and view. They evaluate artworks and displays from different cultures, times and places. They analyse connections between visual conventions, practices and viewpoints that represent their own and others’ ideas. They identify influences of other artists’ on their own artworks. Students manipulate materials, techniques and processes to develop and refine techniques and processes to represent ideas and subject matter in their artworks. In Year 10 Art, the areas of learning this semester include: Making and Responding to Art. These areas were studied through the topics: Identity and Themed study.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Art through the following topics:

Identity

  • The aim of this unit is to continue the preparation for Stage 1 Visual Art. Student will create a Folio of work based on the theme of Identity. This personal theme allows students to create their own unique artwork using their choice of media and technique. Students will create several artworks including the matchbox work, 2D mixed media artwork and a final artwork. Students will also study and write an essay on the artist Hossein Valamanesh.

Themed study

  • The aim of this unit is to continue practical independent work and further development the student’s preparation for Stage 1 Visual Art. It is a student-selected theme and concept with students’ choice of media.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Identity (50%)

  • Matchbox work
  • 2D mixed media artwork
  • Final artwork
  • Valamanesh essay

Themed study (50%)

  • Folio
  • Final artwork
  • Practitioner’s statement

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 1 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Art include: Stage 1 Visual Art.

Art A


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Visual Art

Required Background: Completion of Year 9 Art

Subject Overview

Visual Art provides students with the skills to evaluate how representations communicate artistic intentions in artworks they make and view. They evaluate artworks and displays from different cultures, times and places. They analyse connections between visual conventions, practices and viewpoints that represent their own and others’ ideas. They identify influences of other artists’ on their own artworks. Students manipulate materials, techniques and processes to develop and refine techniques and processes to represent ideas and subject matter in their artworks. In Year 10 Art, the areas of learning this semester include: Making and Responding to Art. These areas were studied through the topics: Methods and media, Natural form drawings and sculptures and In Focus: Australian artists.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Art through the following topics:

Methods and Media

  • The aim of this FOR Learning unit is to further develop student’s skills using a range of media that is unfamiliar to them. Students will also explore and experiment with different texture mediums. Students will be required to comment on their work and experiments. This is where students can start to specialise in the wide range of media available. Students will create a portfolio of drawings.

Natural Forms

  • The aim of this unit is to help further develop student’s observational drawing skills using the subject matter of nature. An art excursion to the Botanic Gardens is included. These natural form drawings will be stylized and developed from a 2D drawing to a 3D sculpture. Artist study on Andy Goldsworthy will also be completed.

In Focus: Australian artists

  • The aim of this unit is to prepare students for Stage 1 Visual Art by completing a Visual Study. This Visual Study is based on four Australian landscape artists: Albert Namatijira (historical Aboriginal watercolourist), Gloria Petyarre (contemporary Aboriginal hard edge painter), Michael Yates (contemporary Australia painter) and Donna Marie Robinson (contemporary Australian photographer and digital artist). Students will be shown how to use the different media of these artists. Students will analyse, interpret, develop, comment, and research these artists while also completing a final artwork inspired by their techniques and style.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Natural Forms (50%)

  • Artist study
  • Concept development
  • Final found objects sculpture

In Focus: Australian Artists (50%)

  • Visual Study on Australian landscape artists: Albert Namatijira, Gloria Petyarre, Michael Yates and Donna Maree-Robinson
  • A3 finals inspired by each of the four studied artists

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 1 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Art include: Stage 1 Visual Art.

General Mathematics


(Full Year of Study) Learning Area: Mathematics

Subject Overview

The Australian Curriculum for Year 10 General Mathematics provides students with essential mathematical skills and knowledge across three content strands: Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability, whilst developing the proficiencies of Understanding, Fluency, Problem Solving and Reasoning. The proficiencies reinforce the significance of working mathematically within the content and describe how the content is explored or developed. They provide the language to build in the developmental aspects of the learning of mathematics

Students undertake study in Year 10 General Mathematics through the following topics:

Algebraic Expansion and Factorisation

  • Students will factorise algebraic expressions by taking out a common algebraic factor. They will expand binomial products and factorise monic quadratic expressions using a variety of strategies.

Algebraic Fractions and Indices

  • Students will apply the four operations to simple algebraic fractions with numerical denominators. They will simplify algebraic products and quotients using index laws.

Quadratic Equations and Functions

  • Students will solve simple quadratic equations using a range of strategies. They will explore the connection between algebraic and graphical representations of relations such as simple quadratics, using digital technology as appropriate.

Statistics and Probability

  • Students will describe the results of two- and three-step chance experiments, both with and without replacements, assign probabilities to outcomes and determine probabilities of events. They will investigate the concept of independence. Students will use the language of ‘if….then’, ‘given’, ‘of’, ‘knowing that’ to investigate conditional statements and identify common mistakes in interpreting such language. Students will determine quartiles and interquartile range. They will construct and interpret box plots and use them to compare data sets. The will compare shapes of box plots to corresponding histograms and dot plots. Students will use scatter plots to investigate and comment on relationships between two numerical variables. The will investigate and describe bivariate numerical data where the independent variable is time. Students will evaluate statistical reports in the media and other places by linking claims to displays, statistics and representative data.

Money

  • Students will connect the compound interest formula to repeated applications of simple interest using appropriate digital technologies.

Pythagoras’ Theorem and Trigonometry

  • Students will solve right-angled triangle problems including those involving direction and angles of elevation and depression.

Geometric Reasoning

  • Students will formulate proofs involving congruent triangles and angle properties. Students will apply logical reasoning, including the use of congruence and similarity, to proofs and numerical exercises involving plane shapes.

Linear and Non-Linear Relationships

  • Students will solve problems involving linear equations, including those derived from formulas. They will solve linear equations involving simple algebraic fractions. Students will solve linear inequalities and graph their solutions on a number line. Students will solve linear simultaneous equations, using algebraic and graphical techniques including using digital technology. They will solve problems involving parallel and perpendicular lines. Students will solve simple quadratic equations using a range of strategies.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Skills and Application Task (80%)

  • Students undertake at least four skills and application tasks in the form of topic tests.

Mathematical Investigations (20%)

  • Students will undertake at least two folio investigations. Students are required to investigate mathematical relationships, concepts, or problems, which may be set in an applied context.

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 1 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 General Mathematics include: Stage 1 General Mathematics and Stage 1 Essential Mathematics

Mathematical Methods


(Full Year of Study) Learning Area: Mathematics

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 9 Mathematics

Subject Overview

The Australian Curriculum for Mathematics provides students with essential mathematical skills and knowledge across three content strands: Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability, whilst developing the proficiencies of Understanding, Fluency, Problem Solving and Reasoning. The proficiencies reinforce the significance of working mathematically within the content and describe how the content is explored or developed. They provide the language to build in the developmental aspects of the learning of mathematics.
Students undertake study in Year 10 Mathematical Methods through the following topics:

Algebraic Expansion and Factorisation

  • Students will factorise algebraic expressions by taking out a common algebraic factor. They will expand binomial products and factorise monic quadratic expressions using a variety of strategies.

Algebraic Fractions and Indices

  • Students will apply the four operations to simple algebraic fractions with numerical denominators. They will simplify algebraic products and quotients using index laws.

Linear Equations and Inequalities

  • Students will solve problems involving linear equations, including those derived from formulas. They will solve linear equations involving simple algebraic fractions. Students will solve linear inequalities and graph their solutions on a number line.

Quadratic Equations and Functions

  • Students will solve simple quadratic equations using a range of strategies. They will explore the connection between algebraic and graphical representations of relations such as simple quadratics, using digital technology as appropriate.

Money and Measurement

  • Students will connect the compound interest formula to repeated applications of simple interest using appropriate digital technologies. They will solve problems involving surface area and volume for a range of prisms, cylinders and composite solids.

Simultaneous Equations

  • Students will solve linear simultaneous equations, using algebraic and graphical techniques including using digital technology. They will solve problems involving parallel and perpendicular lines.

Triangles

  • Students will solve right-angled triangle problems including those involving direction and angles of elevation and depression. They will formulate proofs involving congruent triangles and angle properties. Students will apply logical reasoning, including the use of congruence and similarity, to proofs and numerical exercises involving plane shapes.

Statistics and Probability

  • Students will describe the results of two- and three-step chance experiments, both with and without replacements, assign probabilities to outcomes and determine probabilities of events. They will investigate the concept of independence. Students will use the language of ‘if….then’, ‘given’, ‘of’, ‘knowing that’ to investigate conditional statements and identify common mistakes in interpreting such language. Students will determine quartiles and interquartile range. They will construct and interpret box plots and use them to compare data sets. The will compare shapes of box plots to corresponding histograms and dot plots. Students will use scatter plots to investigate and comment on relationships between two numerical variables. The will investigate and describe bivariate numerical data where the independent variable is time. Students will evaluate statistical reports in the media and other places by linking claims to displays, statistics and representative data.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Skills and Application Task (80%)

  • Students undertake at least four skills and application tasks in the form of topic tests.

Mathematical Investigation (20%)

  • Students will undertake at least two folio investigations. Students are required to investigate mathematical relationships, concepts, or problems, which may be set in an applied context.

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 1 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Mathematical Methods include: Stage 1 General Mathematics, Stage 1 Mathematical Methods and Stage 1 Specialist Mathematics.

Religious Education


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Humanities

Subject Overview

The Crossways and RAVE Religious Education programmes provide students with knowledge across 8 strands: Believing, Living, Celebrating, Textual, World Religions, Philosophy of Religion, Values and Ethics and Silence & Stillness.  These allow students to explore and develop their own faith as well as growing in their understanding of the faith of others.  In Year 10 RE, the areas of learning this semester included: Beliefs, The Modern Church, Places of Worship and Religion and Ethics.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Religious Studies through the following topics:

Believing

  • Students will explore the concept of belief.  They will examine the various beliefs systems of the main world faiths, with a more detailed focus on Christianity. Students will reflect on their personal beliefs through the writing of a Creed.

The Modern Church

  • Students will identify the reasons why there are different denominations within Christianity.  They will use this as a base to explore why Christians respond differently to certain issues.  Study will focus on the contemporary issue of the ordination of women. 

Places of Worship

  • Students will research different styles of worship, liturgical and non-liturgical.  They will extend their knowledge further by exploring how places of worship reflect the different worship needs of the local faith community. 

Religion and Ethics

  • Study will focus on the exploration of morality, from a personal, societal and faith based viewpoint.  Students will examine a range of medical ethical issues facing the Church in Australia.  They will research how the Australian Church is responding to the issue of sanctity of life, abortion, euthanasia and genetic engineering.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Practical Activity (35%)

  • To design a church for 21st century ecumenical worship
  • Letter to Sophie

Research (35%)

  • Debate on the ordination of women
  • Worship Excursion Task

Reflection (30%)

  • Personal Creed

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 1 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Religious Education include: Religion Studies.

Specialist Mathematics B


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Mathematics

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 9 Mathematics

Subject Overview

The Australian Curriculum for Mathematics provides students with essential mathematical skills and knowledge across three content strands: Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability, whilst developing the proficiencies of Understanding, Fluency, Problem Solving and Reasoning. The proficiencies reinforce the significance of working mathematically within the content and describe how the content is explored or developed. They provide the language to build in the developmental aspects of the learning of mathematics.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Specialist Mathematics, for one Semester, through the following topics:

Advanced Trigonometry

  • Students will establish sine, cosine and area rules for any triangle and use them to solve related problems. They will use the unit circle to define trigonometric functions and graph them. Students will solve simple trigonometric equations.

Polynomials

  • Students will investigate the concept of a polynomial. They will apply the factor and remainder theorem to solve problems.

Surds and Indices

  • Students will define rational and irrational numbers. They will perform operations with surds and fractional indices.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Skills and Application Task (75%)

  • Students undertake at least two skills and application tasks in the form of topic tests.

Mathematical Investigation (25%)

  • Students will undertake at least one folio investigations. Students are required to investigate mathematical relationships, concepts, or problems, which may be set in an applied context.

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 1 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Specialist Mathematics include: Stage 1 Mathematical Methods and Stage 1 Specialist Mathematics.

Specialist Mathematics A


(One Semester of Study) Learning Area: Mathematics

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 9 Mathematics

Subject Overview

The Australian Curriculum for Mathematics provides students with essential mathematical skills and knowledge across three content strands: Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability, whilst developing the proficiencies of Understanding, Fluency, Problem Solving and Reasoning. The proficiencies reinforce the significance of working mathematically within the content and describe how the content is explored or developed. They provide the language to build in the developmental aspects of the learning of mathematics.

Students undertake study in Year 10 Specialist Mathematics, for one Semester, through the following topics:

Advanced Trigonometry

  • Students will establish sine, cosine and area rules for any triangle and use them to solve related problems. They will use the unit circle to define trigonometric functions and graph them. Students will solve simple trigonometric equations.

Polynomials

  • Students will investigate the concept of a polynomial. They will apply the factor and remainder theorem to solve problems.

Surds and Indices

  • Students will define rational and irrational numbers. They will perform operations with surds and fractional indices.

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Skills and Application Task (75%)

  • Students undertake at least two skills and application tasks in the form of topic tests.

Folio (25%)

  • Students will undertake at least one folio investigations. Students are required to investigate mathematical relationships, concepts, or problems, which may be set in an applied context.

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 1 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Year 10 Specialist Mathematics include: Stage 1 Mathematical Methods and Stage 1 Specialist Mathematics.

Business and Enterprise


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Business Enterprise & Technology

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 English.

Subject Overview

Students learn about successful management in personal, business, and social contexts, on a local, national, and global scale. They gain knowledge and understanding of business operations; develop financial and technological skills; participate in planning, developing, and controlling business activities; and evaluate decisions on business practices. Students have the opportunity to engage with innovations and ideas, as well as to reflect on current business and enterprise issues and make informed decisions. Students assess the impact and effects of business, enterprise, and technology on the economy, environment, and the wellbeing and lifestyle of individuals and communities.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 Business and Enterprise through the following topics:

Core Topic

  • Business structures and classifications
  • Business functions and processes

Marketing 

  • Customer and Buyer behaviour
  • Developing marketing strategies
  • Ethical and legal aspects of marketing

Globalisation

  • Globalisation impacts on business
  • Ethical practice and fair trade

Entrepreneurship 

  • Entrepreneurship
  • Enterprising skills

Business Plans 

  • Legal registration considerations
  • The role of the business plan
  • The business planning process and elements
  • Create a business plan (entered into CPA Competition)

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Folio (40%)

  • Community research tasks
  • Case studies

Practical (40%)

  • A product or plan development: Marketing research & product development

Issue Study (20%)

  • An investigation of an issue or a trend related to marketing

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Business & Enterprise include: Stage 2 Business & Enterprise.

Information Processing and Publishing


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Business Enterprise & Technology

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 Information Technology or Year 10 Information Processing & Publishing (Desktop)

Subject Overview

Students apply practical skills and design principles to provide creative solutions to text-based communication tasks, using imagination and creativity to make proposals and choices. They use the design process to apply problem-solving, critical-thinking, and decision-making skills. They learn a variety of strategies for meeting identified needs of the client. Students create both hard-copy and electronic text-based publications, and document the development process. Students identify and use the computer hardware and software to process, manage and communicate information in a range of contexts including editorial publication or product and web design. They analyse the impacts and consequences of the use of publishing technologies.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 Information Processing & Publishing through the following topics:

Desktop Publishing

  • Students develop knowledge and understanding of the design process in developing print based documents.

Electronic Publishing

  • Students develop knowledge and understanding of the design process in developing electronic documents and websites

Product and Documentation

  • Develop a product for a chosen scenario
  • Document the investigating, devising, producing and evaluation of the product

Issues Analysis

  • Perform an analysis and evaluation of the impacts of social ,ethical and legal issues related to the selected investigation

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Issues Analysis (30%)

  • An investigation of an issue
  • An investigation of a second issue

Practical Skills (40%)

  • Desktop publishing in designing print based solutions
  • Electronic Publishing of electronic documents and webpages

Folio (30%)

  • Product and Documentation

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Information Processing & Publishing: Stage 2 Information Processing & Publishing.

Information Technology


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Business Enterprise & Technology

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 Information Technology or Year 10 Information Processing & Publishing (Desktop)

Subject Overview

Students investigate existing IT systems to discover their function and how their components interact. They analyse issues associated with network security and computer networks basics. Students develop and apply specialised knowledge and understanding within given tasks and use a range of skills and techniques to create their own database systems to be tested and evaluated. Students develop the ability to critically analyse and reflect on issues related to the increased use of and dependence on computer-based systems in society, and investigate the associated ethics. Students develop multimedia programming skills to problem solve programming issues.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 Information Technology through the following topics:

Computer Systems

  • Students examine the components of a typical micro-computer system and the concepts of computer use;
  • Students study the basics of computer networks and communications technology;
  • Students investigate issues associated with the development of information.

Relational Databases

  • Develop an understanding of database principles;
  • Construct a relational database that stores data efficiently;
  • Use a problem-solving approach of the systems development life cycle to build an information system.

Application and Multimedia Programming:

  • Develop an understanding of programming by constructing an application program and developing in a multimedia environment;
  • Design of the interface, navigation, integration of media and finished layout of the system must be user-friendly;
  • Use a problem-solving approach of the systems development life cycle to build an interactive multimedia system.

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Folio (20%)

  • Issues investigation
  • Computer systems Test

Project (35%)

  • Design a database project around a given design brief
  • Design a Multimedia programming project around a given design brief

Skills & Application (45%)

  • Database skills test
  • Computer systems skills test
  • Multimedia and application programming skills test

This subject does include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Information Technology: Stage 2 Information Technology.

Material Products


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Business Enterprise and Technology

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 Material Products

Subject Overview

Students demonstrate their design and technological ability through activities in contexts that have a practical outcome. They develop the ability to initiate, create and develop products in response to a design brief and evaluate the process and final product. Based on their testing and understanding of the physical properties and working characteristics of materials, students make sound decisions about materials and techniques and develop skills to competently use tools and materials safely. Students analyse the impacts of technology on individuals and the environment related to their product material.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 Material Products through the following topics:

Skills and Application

  • Students develop knowledge and understanding of safe work practices and methods for both hand and machine joint and product construction.
  • Students research material properties and design testing methods to determine best material choices for the major product

Product

  • Students undertake construction of a given minor product.
  • Students undertake construction of major product of their own design.

Folio

  • Students undertake the design, investigation, planning and evaluation of a major product of their own design

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Folio (30%)

  • An investigation and planning of a student designed product
  • A CAD design
  • An evaluation of a project

Product (50%)

  • Construction of a given Minor Product
  • Construction of a student designed Major Product

Skills (20%)

  • Hand Skills test
  • Machine skills test
  • Material application testing and investigation

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Material Products: Stage 2 Material Products.

Workplace Practices


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Business Enterprise and Technology

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 English.

Subject Overview

Students develop knowledge, skills & understanding of the nature, type & structure of the workplace. They explore the relationship between the changing nature of work, industrial relations influences & workplace issues. Students develop skills and understanding to be able to explain concepts of industry and work. They analyse the relationships between work-related issues and practices in workplaces and demonstrate knowledge of the roles of individuals, government legislation and policies, unions, and employer groups in work-related and workplace issues. Students investigate the dynamic nature of work-related and workplace issues, cultures, and/or environments. They demonstrate and apply generic work skills and, where relevant, industry knowledge and skills, in a workplace and/or work-related context.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 Workplace Practices through the following topics:

Workers Rights and Responsibilities

  • Work Health and Safety
  • Unions and Trade Associations
  • Equal Employment Opportunity

Career Planning

  • Networking
  • Job hunting
  • Portfolios, Cover letters, Resumes and Interview techniques

Future Trends in the World of work

  • Changing patterns in work Networking
  • Casualisation of the workforce

The value of unpaid work

  • Volunteering
  • Issues with unpaid work

Performance

  • Working experience 30 hours of experience  
  • Students can use paid work, volunteering or may undertake a work experience block in the term holidays.

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Folio (40%)

  • An investigation of an issue or a trend
  • A practical or skills demonstration
  • A project
  • An oral presentation

Performance (40%)

  • 25 - 30 hours of working experience/placement per semester

Reflection (20%)

  • Written reflection on the working experience

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Workplace practice include: Stage 2 Workplace Practice.

Indonesian


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Languages

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 Indonesian

Subject Overview

Students continue to develop and apply their intercultural language skills to interact orally with others to exchange information, ideas, opinions, and experiences in Indonesian on a variety of topics within the three themes, The Indonesian-Speaking Community, The Individual and The Changing World. They produce a variety of written texts in Indonesian for specific audiences, purposes and contexts expressing information, feelings, ideas, and opinions on a range of issues.

Students analyse aural, written and audio-visual texts exploring their linguistic and cultural richness and respond in detail to questions about the texts. Active reflection examining the relationships between language, culture and identity, and the ways in which culture influences communication is core.
Students undertake study in Stage 1 Indonesian (continuers) through the following topics:

Geography and Environment of Indonesia

  • Students explore the richness and diversity of the Indonesian archipelago, both geographically and anthropologically. 

The World of Music

  • Students discover the history and diversity of popular music culture throughout Indonesia and the influences from other cultures, genres and religion.

Visiting Indonesia

  • Students immerse themselves in an imagined experience as an exchange student in Java’s cultural hub, Yogyakarta. They learn what it means to live in an authentic Indonesian way and participate in the day-to-day lifestyle of a Javanese teenager.

Festivals and Ceremonies

  • Students examine how and what Indonesian people celebrate. They delve into religious, ethnic and personal celebrations, making comparisons with what and how Australians celebrate.

Environmental Preservation

  • Students discover a range of environmental issues impacting Indonesian communities and the wildlife native to South-East Asia. They consider changes and improvements to ensure a sustainable future.

Indonesian Heroes

  • Students identify and research a range of key historical figures in Indonesia’s history and their impact on Indonesian politics and society then and now.

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Text Production (20%)

  • Students create a text in which they express ideas, information, opinions and feelings using written Indonesian

Text Analysis (20%)

  • Students analyse and interpret a text or texts that are in Indonesian with a response or responses in Indonesian and/or English.

Oral Interaction (20%)

  • Students interact with others to exchange information, ideas, opinions, and experiences using spoken Indonesian.

Investigation (40%)

  • Students undertake an investigation demonstrating research and personal reflection on a cultural or social aspect associated with Indonesia

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Indonesian (continuers) include: Stage 2 Indonesian (continuers).

Visual Art


(2x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Visual Art

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 Art

Subject Overview

Stage 1 Visual Art involves students studying the Art movement, ‘Surrealism’, for their Visual Study. After choosing three artists students investigate, research, analyse and create practical experiments based on and inspired by their chosen artists. Students explore individual themes for their Folio. Students are responsible for selecting their artist's influences, the media, style and techniques.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 Visual Art through the following topics:

Folio

The ‘Folio’ is the main focus.  This is a collection of each student’s own original ideas and explorations.

Students produce one Folio of twenty A3 pages documenting their Visual Learning in support of their one Practical works of art.
Students choose the idea focus and direction for their practical.

Visual thinking skills are integral to the creative or problem solving process for artists and designers.

Practical

The Practical is marked in two parts: The final artwork and the Practitioner’s statement.

Students produce one final artwork or ‘Practical’. There must be one resolved work or a body of work. Production of this work must involve the application of technical skills.

Visual artworks can be resolved using various practical genres which may include:

  • Video, installation, assemblage, digital imaging, painting, drawing, mixed media, printmaking & wood

Students write one written statement (250 words) for their resolved Practical. Students will evaluate their work, explain the idea, influences and connections with other practitioners, and generally provide insight into how processes have shaped their outcome.

Visual Study

A Visual Study is an exploration of, or experimentation with, one and more styles, ideas, concepts, media, techniques or technologies based on research and analysis of the work of other practitioners.

The topic of the Visual Study for Semester One is the art movement Surrealism. Students submit twelve A3 pages (or equivalent) of practical study and research integrated with no more than 750 words or 5 minutes of recorded oral presentation.

The Visual Study topic for Semester Two is student choice.

 

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Folio (40%)

  • Folio – 15 pages

Practical (30%)

  • Practical – final artwork
  • Practitioner’s statement – 250 words

Visual Study (30%)

  • 12 pages with 750 words embedded

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

Further Study Options
Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Visual Art include: Stage 2 Visual Art.
 

Essential Mathematics


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Mathematics

Pre-requisite Information: Nil

Subject Overview

General Mathematics extends students’ mathematical skills in ways that apply to practical problem solving. A problem-based approach is integral to the development of mathematical models and the associated key ideas in the topics. These topics cover a diverse range of applications of mathematics, including personal financial management, measurement and trigonometry, the statistical investigation process, modelling using linear and non-linear functions, and discrete modelling using networks and matrices.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 General Mathematics through the following topics:

Calculations, Time and Ratio

  • Students extend their proficiency with calculations required for everyday life. Computational skills are practised within contexts that are relevant to the students’ interests. 

Earning and Spending

  • This topic examines basic financial calculations in the context of the students’ personal experiences and intended pathways. Students understand the different ways of being paid for work and the impact of taxation on their income. They learn to manage spending of their earnings through budgeting.

Geometry

  • Students name a variety of common two and three-dimensional figures and classify them according to their geometric properties. The identify the geometry involved in structures on the built environment and landscapes

Data in Context

  • Students learn to use various statistical tools and techniques for working with data. They manipulate and represent data on which to base sound statistical arguments.

Measurement

  • Students extend their skills in estimating, measuring, and calculating in practical situations. They identify problems involving length, area, mass, volume, and capacity and apply relevant techniques to solve them.

Investing

  • Students investigate interest, term deposits, and the costs of credit, using current and relevant examples. To explore the concepts and uses of simple and compound interest, students collect and analyse materials from various financial institutions outlining their financial products.

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Skills and Application Task (60%)

  • Students undertake at least four skills and application tasks in the form of topic tests.

Folio (40%)

  • Students will undertake at least two folio investigations. Students are required to investigate mathematical relationships, concepts, or problems, which may be set in an applied context.

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Essential Mathematics include Stage 2 Essential Mathematics

General Mathematics


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Mathematics

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 General Mathematics

Subject Overview

General Mathematics extends students’ mathematical skills in ways that apply to practical problem solving. A problem-based approach is integral to the development of mathematical models and the associated key ideas in the topics. These topics cover a diverse range of applications of mathematics, including personal financial management, measurement and trigonometry, the statistical investigation process, modelling using linear and non-linear functions, and discrete modelling using networks and matrices.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 General Mathematics through the following topics:

Investing and Borrowing

  • Students discuss reasons for investing money and investigate using financial institutions and the share market as vehicles for investment of a sum of money. They calculate their expected returns from simple and compound interest investments using electronic technology and examine the effects of changing interest rates.

Measurement

  • Students apply measurement techniques such as estimation, units of measurement, scientific notation, and measuring devices and their accuracy. They extend their understanding of Pythagoras’ theorem and use formulae to calculate the perimeter, area, and volume of standard plane and solid shapes

Statistical Investigation

  • This topic begins with the consideration of the structure of the process of statistical investigation from the collection of data using various methods of sampling. Through its analysis students learn to form conjectures that are supported or refuted by a logical argument.

Applications of Trigonometry

  • Students focus on the calculations involved in triangle geometry and their many applications in practical contexts such as construction, surveying, design, and navigation.

Linear and Exponential Functions and their Graphs

  • Students examine linear and exponential functions through a study of the various forms in which relationships can be represented. They identify the links that allow them to move between these representations and learn to use electronic technology to analyse and solve problems and make predictions.  

Matrices and Networks

  • This topic introduces students to discrete mathematics through the application of matrices and graph theory to solving problems in familiar contexts.

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester.

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Skills and Application Task (75%)

  • Students undertake at least four skills and application tasks in the form of topic tests.

Mathematical Investigations (25%)

  • Students will undertake at least two mathematical investigations. Students are required to investigate mathematical relationships, concepts, or problems, which may be set in an applied context.

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 General Mathematics include: Stage 2 General Mathematics and Stage 2 Essential Mathematics

Mathematical Methods


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Mathematics

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 Mathematical Methods

Subject Overview

Mathematics develops an increasingly complex and sophisticated understanding of calculus, statistics, mathematical arguments and proofs, and using mathematical models. By using functions, their derivatives and integrals, and by mathematically modelling physical processes, students develop a deep understanding of the physical world through a sound knowledge of relationships involving rates of change. Students use statistics to describe and analyse phenomena that involve uncertainty and variation.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 Mathematical Methods through the following topics:

Functions and Graphs

  • Students explore the relationships between variables that show a constant rate of change, as well as inverse relationships and circular relationships. Emphasis is placed on describing, sketching, interpreting, and discussing the behaviour of graphs that arise from everyday situations.

Polynomials

  • Building on from the skills and understanding that students have developed in the topic of Functions and Graphs, students explore relationships that are more complex that linear models.

Trigonometry

  • The study of trigonometry enables students to expand their mathematical modelling into contexts such as construction, design, navigation, and surveying by using periodic functions. Students extend their understanding of trigonometry into non-right angled triangles.

Counting and Statistics

  • Students study inferential statistics with the introduction of counting techniques and the use of combinations for counting the number of selections from a group. An exploration of distributions and measures of spread extends the students’ knowledge of the measures of central tendency in statistics.

Growth and Decay

  • Students study exponential and logarithmic functions under the unifying idea of modelling growth and decay. 

Introduction to Differential Calculus

  • The development of calculus enables the study of the links between variables that are constantly changing. Students investigate rates and average rates of change.

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester.

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Skills and Application Task (75%)

  • Students undertake at least four skills and application tasks in the form of topic tests.

Mathematical Investigation (25%)

  • Students will undertake at least two folio investigations. Students are required to investigate mathematical relationships, concepts, or problems, which may be set in an applied context.

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Mathematical Methods include: Stage 2 Mathematical Methods and Stage 2 General Mathematics

Specialist Mathematics


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Mathematics

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 Mathematical Methods

Subject Overview

Mathematics develops an increasingly complex and sophisticated understanding of calculus, statistics, mathematical arguments and proofs, and using mathematical models. By using functions, their derivatives and integrals, and by mathematically modelling physical processes, students develop a deep understanding of the physical world through a sound knowledge of relationships involving rates of change. Students use statistics to describe and analyse phenomena that involve uncertainty and variation.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 Mathematical Methods through the following topics:

Arithmetic and Geometric Sequences and Series

  • Students explore arithmetic and geometric sequences and their applications, such as growth and decay

Geometry

  • Students study geometry of planar figures. The focus is on forming and testing hypotheses about their properties, which if proved to be true become theorems.

Vectors in the Plane

  • The study of vectors in the plane provides new perspectives for working with two-dimensional space. Students study vector operations, their applications, and their use in proving results in geometry.

Further Trigonometry

  • In this topic students extend their understanding of trigonometric functions. Students model circular motion in the familiar contexts of, for example, Ferris wheels, merry-go-rounds, and bicycle wheels.

Matrices

  • Matrices provide new perspectives for working with two-dimensional space. Students’ study of matrices includes extension of matrix arithmetic to applications such as linear transformations of the plane, solving systems of linear equations and cryptography.

Real and Complex Numbers

  • Students continue their study of numbers. Mathematical induction is introduced as a way of providing a given statement for all integers. Complex numbers extend the concept of the number line to the two-dimensional complex plane. This topic introduces operations with complex numbers, their geometric representation, and their use in solving problems that cannot be solved with real numbers alone.

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Skills and Application Task (75%)

  • Students undertake at least four skills and application tasks in the form of topic tests.

Mathematical Investigations (25%)

  • Students will undertake at least two mathematical investigations. Students are required to investigate mathematical relationships, concepts, or problems, which may be set in an applied context.

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Mathematics include: Stage 2 Mathematical Methods and Stage 2 General Mathematics

Drama


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Drama

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 Drama

Subject Overview

Stage 1 Drama involves the immersion of students in the process and skills required for putting on a large production. All aspects of the theatre are addressed with students to develop sound understanding and participation and to develop their page-to-stage knowledge and skills. Students broaden their skills further by viewing and analysing live theatre and filming a group presentation on a hypothetical production.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 Drama through the following topics:

Performance

  • Undertake a large group performance as either an on or off stage role. The performance is rehearsed and performed to a large audience.

Folio

  • Review: Two live performances are viewed and then a written critique and analysis is undertaken, in 800 words each.
  • Production Report: After the completion of the group performance a written analysis of the process of putting the production together and the success of the performances is documented and written in a 1,000 word report.

Investigation-Presentation

  • Group Presentation on a particular production and undertaking the roles of putting the production together. In their group students focus on one theatre element such as Set Design and undertake a video presentation.

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester.

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Performance (40%)

  • Group performance

Folio (30%)

  • Review
  • Production Report

Investigation (30%)

  • Oral presentation filmed and performed

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Drama include: Stage Two Drama.

English


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: English

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 English

Subject Overview

Stage 1 English focuses on the exploration and development of English skills through reading, viewing, writing, speaking and using technology in appropriate ways and for different purposes. Students learn to analyse techniques specific to different genres while making connections between their own personal ideas and beliefs, and those explored within the texts. Through the deconstruction of other authors’ creative writing, students develop the skills to compose their own texts.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 English through the following topics:

Film

  • Analyse and discuss key ideas and cinematic techniques explored by the Director

Novel

  • Analyse and explore how the author uses characters, setting, and literary technique to convey key ideas

Short Stories

  • Critically analyse a range of short stories from the Mystery genre

Poetry

  • Explore and analyse Protest Poetry of World War II, examing how poetic devices convey key ideas

Narrative Writing

  • Write a creative piece of narrative writing using narrative story structure

Exposition

  • Use persuasive language techniques and Campaign strategies to create an Election speech

Language Study

  • An in depth focus on language in advertising is used to create and reflect on a new advertisement

Recount

  • Produce a recount, following recount style and structure

Comedy Skit

  • Create a comedy skit using the skills and techniques from a particular comedy style

Connected Text

  • Analyse the creation of humour through character, setting, dialogue etc. and discuss how comedy is created for a particular audience

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Responding to Texts (40%)

  • Film
  • Novel
  • Short Stories
  • Poetry

Creating Texts (40%)

  • Narrative
  • Exposition
  • Recount
  • Comedy

Intertextual Study (20%)

  • Language Study
  • Connected Text

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 English include: Essential English; English.

Essential English


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: English

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 English

Content

Essential English focuses on the development of English skills through viewing, writing and using technology for different purposes. Students learn about the use and function of language in documentary, film review, and advertising contexts. They develop personal writing techniques through a focus on narrative and email. Students also develop skills of persuasion, analysis, and reflection on work throughout the semester. 

Documentary Analysis

  • Analyse and discuss key ideas and cinematic techniques explored by the Director of a documentary

Film Review

  • Review 3 different film texts, discussing similarities and differences between purpose, audience, and form.

Narrative Writing

  • Write a creative piece of narrative writing using narrative story structure

Formal Email

  • Study the conventions of formal emails and gain information on writing to a prospective employer

Advertisement

  • Use persuasive language to create a persuasive advertisement

Film Study

  • Draw personal connections to values and concerns presented in a film

Short Story Review

  • Explore characters, setting, structure and style to review a short story

Recount

  • Construct a recount using the form and structure studied in class

Instructional Oral

  • Examine various ways of communicating

Persuasive Writing

  • Use a prompt to create a piece of persuasive writing

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Responding to Texts (40%)

  • Documentary Analysis
  • Film Review
  • Film Study
  • Short Story Review

Creating Texts (60%)

  • Narrative
  • Formal Email
  • Advertisement
  • Recount
  • Instructional Oral
  • Persuasive Writing

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Essential English include: Essential English

English Literary Studies


(2 x 10 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: English

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 English

Subject Overview

Stage 1 English Literary Studies focuses on the exploration and development of English skills through reading, viewing, writing, speaking, and using technology in appropriate ways and for different purposes. Students study the use of language through close readings, both shared and individual, of a range of texts. In comparative exercises, students recognise the connections between texts through responses that integrate discussion of texts. By focusing on the creativity and craft of other authors, both classic and contemporary, students develop skills in composing texts. Students undertake study in Stage 1 English Literary Studies through the following topics:

Novel

  • Analyse how an author uses a range of language features and stylistic conventions to explore key themes

Film

  • Analyse and discuss how cinematic techniques are used by the Director to explore key themes and influence the viewer’s response

Shakespeare Study

  • Analyse how language and stylistic features are used to explore the central themes of a Shakespearean tragedy

Critical Reading

  • A close reading of a variety of short texts, discussing elements of form, purpose, audience and techniques used by the authors

Recount

  • Create a reflective recount which reveals how a key event has had a significant personal impact

Narrative Writing

  • Write a narrative text featuring narrative story structure and an inspired voice which involves the transformation of another text

Poetry

  • Explore and analyse a range of mainly 20th Century poets, analysing their use of poetic devices to convey key ideas

Connected Text

  • Independently compare a novel and film for analysis, exploring connections between characters, setting, themes and techniques, and the author’s intention and impact on the audience.

Assessment

Assessment
Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester.

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Responding to Texts (50%)

  • Novel
  • Film
  • Shakespeare Study
  • Critical Reading (Media)

Creating Texts (20%)

  • Recount
  • Narrative

Intertextual Study (30%)

  • Poetry
  • Connected Texts

This subject does include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 English Literary Studies include: Essential English; English; English Literary Studies.

Geography


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Humanities

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 Humanities

Subject Overview

Through the study of Geography, students develop an understanding of the spatial interrelationships between people, places, and environments. They appreciate the complexity of our world, the diversity of its environments, and the challenges and associated opportunities facing Australia and the world. Geography develops an appreciation that place matters in explanations of economic, social, and environmental phenomena and processes. They use this knowledge to promote a more sustainable way of life and an awareness of social and spatial inequalities.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 Geography through the following topics:

Urban Places

  • Urban planning and development
  • Liveability and sustainability of cities and suburbs
  • A case study of a sustainable urban place.

Megacities

  • Migration
  • Environmental, social, and economic challenges and responses
  • Community and well-being within informal settlements
  • A case study of a megacity

Biological and Human Induced Hazards

  • Types of biological and/or human-induced hazards
  • Case studies of a biological or human-induced hazard,
  • Risk management , including possible prevention, control, and containment

Natural Hazards

  • An overview of the types and classification of natural hazards
  • Global distribution of natural hazards
  • Case studies of a natural hazard type, examining: - causes, vulnerability to risk, risk management, prevention, mitigation, preparedness, impacts on populations and the environment, and local, national, and global responses to disasters.

Global Issues

  • In-depth study of a current issue facing global environments and communities.

At the global scale, students might investigate, for example:

  • Global conflicts about resource allocations such as water
  • Impacts of global consumerism
  • Global waste management issues, such as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch
  • Global inequalities, for example, in access to education or vaccinations
  • Energy options, such as coal seam gas, nuclear, solar, tidal, or wind farms

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Geographical Skills and Applications (75%)

  • Test
  • Report
  • Broadsheet

Fieldwork (25%)

  • A report based on information gathered by students during a fieldtrip

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Geography include: Geography, Society and Culture and Tourism.

Chemistry


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Science

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 Science

Subject Overview

Through Stage 1 Chemistry students study the matter that makes up materials, and the properties, uses, means of production, and reactions of these materials.

Students consider how human beings make use of the earth's resources and the impact of human activities on the environment. They develop investigation skills, and an understanding of the physical world that enables them to be questioning, reflective, and critical thinkers.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 Chemistry through the following topics:

Materials and their Atoms

  • Properties and uses of materials, Atomic structure, Quantities of atoms, The Periodic Table,

Combining of Atoms

  • Types of materials, Bonding between atoms, Quantities of molecules and ions,

Molecules

  • Molecule polarity, Interactions between molecules, Hydrocarbons, Polymers,

Mixtures and Solutions

  • Miscibility and solutions, Solutions and ionic substances, Quantities in reactions, Energy in reactions,

Acids and Bases

  • Acid – base concepts, Reactions of acids and bases, The pH scale,

Redox Reactions

  • Concepts of oxidation and reduction, Metal reactivity, Electrochemistry,

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Investigations Folio (60%)

  • Practical Investigations with written reports
  • Science as a Human Endeavour Investigation

Skills and Applications Tasks (40%)

  • Topic Tests
  • Assignments

This subject includes include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Chemistry include: Stage 2 Chemistry, Stage 2 Biology and/or Stage 2 Scientific Studies.

Child Studies


(2 x 10 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Food and Hospitality

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 English or Year 10 Food and Hospitality

Subject Overview

Students gain an understanding of children through individual, collaborative and practical learning. Students examine values and beliefs about the development, needs and rights of children. Analyse current trends in relation to government and global initiatives for the well-being and protection of children. Students analyse contemporary issues and current trends, developing their research, literacy and analytical skills. A range of practical skills are further enhanced in the areas of management, organisation, use of resources and occupational health and safety requirements for working with children.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 Child Studies through the following tasks:

Pre-Natal Development

  • Needs and development of a newborn baby, postnatal issue, impact on the health, development, well-being of baby and family, care for a simulated doll

Importance of Reading

  • Importance of reading on children’s development, characteristics of a successful storybook, create a story book for a Kindergarten aged child

Creating an Educational Toy

  • Areas of development, type of play, designing and creating a safe and educational toy for a specific age group between 0-8

Importance of Social Competence on Development

  • Issue of childhood social competence, interactions in relation to child development and well-being, parent, birthday party activities, create a birthday cake

Computer Games to Real Life

  • Issue of childhood social competence, interactions in relation to child development and well-being, parent, birthday party activities, create a birthday cake

Childhood Safety

  • Present an interactive learning activity to a junior primary class focused on childhood safety

Investigation

  • Students are to investigate and respond to the issue regarding ‘parenting rights’ and their suitability to parent in relation to the safety, health and wellbeing of children through the focus question: “Should all Australian’s have the right to conceive and parent children?”

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Practical Activity (50%)

  • Action Plan or Research Task
  • Practical Application
  • Individual Evaluation Report

Group Activity (25%)

  • Group Action Plan
  • Group Practical Application
  • Individual Evaluation

Investigation (25%)

  • Investigation and Critical Analysis
  • Reflection

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Child Studies include: Stage 2 Child Studies and Stage 2 Food and Hospitality

Food and Hospitality


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Food and Hospitality

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Stage 1 Food and Hospitality or English

Subject Overview

Students examine the dynamic nature of the food and hospitality industry, understanding contemporary approaches and issues through completion of an Individual Investigation into a topic of their choice. Students develop their individual practical skills using technology in the preparation and handling of food. Students complete practical units based on Seasonal Foods, Cultural Trends, Ethical Foods and Pasta.

Students also work collaboratively to complete a Group Catering task.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 Food and Hospitality through the following topics:

Seasonal Produce

  • Investigate how the local Restaurant Industry benefits from embracing and using local and/or seasonal produce, practical application, individual evaluation

Pasta to GO

  • Healthy alternatives for the busy family, practical application, group action plan, individual evaluation

Cultural Foods

  • Re-invent and modernise a traditional cultural dish for the restaurant industry in South Australia. Action plan, practical application, individual evaluation

Make me a Pizza Pie

  • Design/make a new Pizza dish in a modern and trendy manner for the restaurant industry in South Australia. Action plan, practical application, individual evaluation

Street Food Stalls

  • Understanding the factors that influence food choices (e.g. class, race, culture, gender, age, religion, and the media). Collaborative action plan, practical application, individual evaluation

Fair trade and Ethical Foods

  • Awareness of the current trends in the use of Fairtrade and Ethical food produce. Research, practical application, individual evaluation

Investigation

  • Students identify, investigate, and reflect on a contemporary issue related to the Food and Hospitality Industry

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester.

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Practical (50%)

  • Problem solving
  • Practical application
  • Individual evaluation report

Group Activity (20%)

  • Group Decision Making
  • Group Practical Application
  • Individual Evaluation Report

Investigation (30%)

  • Investigation and critical analysis

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Food and Hospitality include: Stage 2 Food and Hospitality and Stage 2 Child Studies.

Physical Education


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Health and Physical Education

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 Physical Education

Subject Overview

Students gain an understanding of human functioning and physical activity, and an awareness of the community structures and practices that influence participation in physical activity. They explore their own physical capacities through a range of individual and team practical units and analyse performance, health, and lifestyle issues. Students develop skills in communication, investigation, and the ability to apply knowledge to practical situations.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 Physical Education through the following topics:

Energy Systems

  • ATP, sources of nutrients, Aerobic and Anaerobic Energy production, contribution of energy Systems for specific activities

Skill Acquisition

  • Classification of skills, characteristics of skilled performer, information processing model, stages of learning

Training Methods and Principles

  • What are the different training methods and how do we apply them for a specific sport/training session

Acute and Chronic responses of the Body

  • Short and long term responses of the body to exercise within the Circulatory, Respiratory and Muscular systems

Circulatory and Respiratory Systems

  • Composition of the blood, functions of the blood, blood vessels, the heart, structure of respiratory system, breathing mechanism, anatomy of the lungs

Fitness Factors

  • Measuring and monitoring of fitness relevant to performance

Badminton

  • Overhead clear, long and short serve, drop shot, smash, net roll, net kill and application to singles and doubles

Touch Football

  • Passing, roll ball, rucking sequence, tactical manoeuvres (switches and wraps)

Table Tennis

  • Forehand and backhand topspin, push, chop and slice serve, drop shot, smash and application to singles and doubles games

Kayaking

  • Forward and reverse paddling, capsize, sweep and draw stroke

Indoor Cricket

  • Bowling, batting, fielding and application of tactics within small sided games

Training Methods

  • Interval, fartlek, continuous, weight, fitball and plyometric training

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Practical (50%)

  • Practical Skills and Application
  • Initiative and collaboration

Folio (50%)

  • Topic Tests
  • Assignments
  • Issues Analysis

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Physical Education include: Stage 2 Physical Education and/or Stage 2 Sports Studies.

Physics


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Science

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 Science

Co-requisite Information: Must be studying Stage 1 General Mathematics

Subject Overview

The study of physics enables students to understand and appreciate the world around them. This subject requires the interpretation of physical phenomena through a study of motion in two dimensions, electricity and magnetism, light and matter, and atoms and nuclei. As well as applying knowledge to solve problems, students develop experimental, investigation design, information, and communication skills through practical and other learning activities. They gather evidence from experiments and research and acquire new knowledge through their own investigations.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 Physics through the following topics:

Linear Motion and Forces

  • Motion under constant acceleration, Forces, Newton’s Laws of motion,

Electric Circuits

  • Potential difference and electric current, Resistance, Circuit Analysis, Electrical Power,

Heat

  • Heat and Temperature, Specific Heat Capacity, Change of State,

Energy and Momentum

  • Energy, Momentum,

Waves

  • Wave model, Mechanical Waves, Light,

Nuclear models and reactivity

  • The nucleus, Radioactive decay, Radioactive half-life, Induced nuclear reactions,

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Investigations Folio (60%)

  • Practical Investigations with written reports
  • Science as a Human Endeavour Investigation

Skills and Assessment Tasks (40%)

  • Topic Tests
  • Assignments

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Physics include: Stage 2 Physics and/or Stage 2 Scientific Studies.

Religion Studies


(1 x 10 Credits, Half Year) Learning Area: Humanities

Pre-requisite Information: Nil

Subject Overview

Students will learn about religion in contemporary Australian society.  They will deepen and broaden their understanding of Christian traditions as well as building on knowledge of world religions.  They will gain an insight in to the social significance of religion.

Students develop their knowledge and understanding of world religions as well as skills in the following areas: investigation and application; communication and analysis and personal reflection.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 Religion Studies through the following topics:

Religion in Australia

  • Students consider the multi-faith nature of Australia and investigate the various manifestations of religion in society

Serving Others

  • Students consider how the concept of serving others is present in various world religions

Environmental Ethics

  • Students look at religious views on the environment.  They consider specific environmental issues from the perspective of a number of world religions

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Practical Activity (35%)

  • Religion in Australia presentation

Research (35%)

  • Religious environmental ethics report

Reflection (30%)

  • Serving others reflection paper

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Religion Studies include: Stage 2 Religion Studies.

Research Practices


(1 x 10 Credits, Half Year) Learning Area: Cross Discplinary Studies

Important Information: This subject is designed to prepare students for the Research Project at Stage 2.

Subject Overview

This subject provides students with opportunities to: examine the purpose of research, explore a range of research approaches and develop their investigative and inquiry skills.  Students explore research practices to develop skills in undertaking research, such as planning their research, developing and analysing their data, and presenting their research findings.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 subject through the following topics:

Research Methods

  • Students look at a specific research method (quantitative – conducting a survey): Students choose 5 appropriate questions to discover information about a topic of their choice. Students demonstrate their knowledge of constructing appropriate survey questions and conducting the research to answer their focus questions.

Designing a Research Question and Choosing Appropriate Research Processes

  • Students design their own research question: They pick one research method and explain why that was the most appropriate.  They then pick one process and conduct their research.  They produce a presentation detailing which method and process were chosen and why as well as their key findings and resolution to their chosen question.

Source Analysis

  • Students choose / are given a research question.  They choose two sources and produce a source analysis for both.  They then answer their question (through synthesis) based on their findings from their sources.

Evaluating Sources

  • Students will produce a report where they analyse and interpret the information obtained from their small group work in design a research question.  The report will include presenting key findings to answer their research question from their particular sources and explain which sources were the most useful and why.

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Folio (50%)

  • Research Methods
  • Developing a Research question

Source Analysis (50%)

  • Source Analysis
  • Evaluating sources

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Stage 2 Research Project.

Scientific Studies


(2 x 10 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Science

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 Science

Subject Overview

Stage 1 Scientific Studies students develop their knowledge of scientific concepts, the ability to use that knowledge to identify issues, and the capacity to acquire new knowledge through their own investigations. Students develop the skills and abilities to explain scientific phenomena and to draw evidence-based conclusions. This is undertaken through the study of Scientific Skills, Forensic Science, and Space. Students take an inquiry based approach to their work, gathering information, evaluating evidence, gaining new knowledge, and applying their learning to related ideas and issues.
Students undertake study in Stage 1 Scientific Studies through the following topics:

Scientific Skills

  • Experimental design, graphing, reporting, analysis and interpretation

Forensic Science

  • The science used in the field of forensics will be learnt and applied through practical activities

Space

  • Students will investigate aspects such as the atmosphere, gravity, and travelling away from and back into the atmosphere

Food and Nutrition

  • Cell structure, function and cell components, nutrients and their role in the body

Sport Science and Biomechanics

  • The science used in the field of sports will be learnt and applied through practical activities

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Investigations Folio (60%)

  • Practical Investigations with written reports
  • Research Investigations
  • Issues Investigation

Skills and Applications Tasks (40%)

  • Oral Presentation
  • Assignment
  • Topic Tests

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Scientific Studies include: Stage 2 Scientific Studies.

Integrated Learning - Sports Studies


(2 x 10 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Health and Physical Education

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 Physical Education

Subject Overview

Students explore their own physical capabilities through practical units of Futsal, AFL, Fitness and Ten Pin Bowling, analysing their technique and application of tactical strategy. Students develop an awareness of community and global structures and practices influencing physical activity. Students showcase an understanding around coaching principles demonstrating their application through running the AFL AUSKICK coaching program and through a World Games unit.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 Sports Studies through the following topics:

Indoor Soccer/Futsal

  • Passing, receiving, headers, attacking and defensive tactics, goal shooting and goal keeping.

Australian Rules Football

  • Handpassing, kicking, marking and application to small sided games

Fitness

  • Research and application of boxercise, fit balls, aerobics, continuous and interval training, skill circuits and elastobands.

Ten Pin Bowling

  • Skills, techniques and analysis of skill performance compared to elite bowlers.

AUSKICK Coaching

  • Develop and apply their coaching skills through the Auskick program

World Games Coaching

  • Lesson plan creation, working in groups, practical application of coaching peers

Patterns of Physical Activity

  • Analysis of current participation trends of physical activity, factors that influence participation.

Issues in Sports Advancement

  • Advancements in technology use in sport, drug use in sport.

Leisure and Recreation

  • Analysis of leisure and recreation opportunities for benefits to wellbeing and health, nature of changing participation patterns.

Australia’s Sporting Identity

  • Government funding and sport, national identity, uniting nations and communities, cultural identity.

Training Regime

  • Investigation and creation of a training regime for a specific target audience.

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Practical (40%)
Students demonstrate Practical Skills and Application whilst showcasing the ability to reflect and evaluate their own and others learning through the following sports:

  • Futsal
  • AFL
  • Fitness
  • Ten Pin Bowling

Group Activity (30%)

  • Students work collaboratively in a group to plan, organise, and implement an AFL AUSKICK coaching program, as well as a World Games session. Students reflect on their contribution and on the collaborative processes and outcomes.

Folio and Discussion (30%)
Students develop a folio of assessment tasks to support their round-table discussion on the depth, extent, and focus of the learning that has taken place.  These assessment tasks include:

  • Patterns of physical activity folio task
  • Issues in sports advancement essay/presentation
  • Australia’s sporting identity folio task
  • Training Regime

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Sports Studies include: Stage 2 Sports Studies.

History


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Humanities

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 Humanities

Subject Overview

In the study of History students explore changes in the world since 1750, examining developments and movements of significance, the ideas that inspired them and the consequences for societies, systems and individuals. Students explore the impacts that these developments and movements had on people’s ideas, perspectives and circumstances.  They investigate ways in which people, groups, and institutions challenge political structures, social organisation, and economic models to transform societies.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 History through the following topics:

Russian Revolution 1900-1932

  • Life in Russia under the Czars
  • Causes of the Revolution – the influence of Rasputin
  • Key Revolutionary events
  • Russia under Lenin

Imperial Expansion – France and Vietnam

  • French Imperialism and the creation of an empire in Asia
  • Vietnam as a Case Study – the impact of Imperialism

Perspectives on Decolonisation – Vietnam

  • Vietnam in the period 1945 - 1960
  • The Vietnam War
  • Vietnam from 1972 to the present

End of Apartheid in South Africa

  • Life in Apartheid South Africa
  • Nelson Mandela and his role in ending Apartheid
  • South Africa in transition

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Historical Skills (75%)

  • Source Analysis
  • Essay
  • Empathy piece

Historical Study (25%)

  • Individual Study on a topic negotiated between the student and teacher.

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 History include: Modern History, Society and Culture and Tourism.

Music


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Music

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C+” grade in Performance units of Year 10 Music

Subject Overview

In Stage 1 Music students will demonstrate technical skill, accuracy, and musicianship as an instrumentalist, vocalist, composer arranger and researcher. Students will demonstrate effective and creative use of one or more of the following: composing, arranging, transcribing, improvising techniques. Throughout the musicianship unit students develop and apply knowledge of musical notation and vocabulary as well as aurally and visually identifying musical elements, stylistic features, and the structure of musical works. Students listen to, analyse, reflect on, and communicate ideas about music, using appropriate terminology. They experience and reflect on music in historical, social and cultural contexts.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 Music through the following topics:

Composing, Arranging, Transcribing and Improvising

  • Students compose, arrange or improvise a work or a section of a work. They listen to and analyse works that highlight specific techniques and structures, explore elements and evaluate works and develop ideas.

Performing

  • Students select, rehearse and perform repertoire as a soloist and a member of an ensemble. They perform in front of a variety of audiences and Students reflect on and appraise their own and others performances.

Musical Styles

  • Students explore the structure, compositional techniques, style, and historical, social and cultural contexts of works.

Theory and Aural Skills

  • Students explore the elements of music completing both aural and theoretical exercises.

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is 100% school-based. The course is comprised of two 10-credit units. Student results are provided to the SACE Board at the conclusion of each semester. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Skills Presentation (60%)

  • Solo Performance
  • Ensemble Performance

Skills Development (40%)

  • Composition/Arrangement/Transcription/Improvisation
  • Research Assignment
  • Theory/Aural Test

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Music include: a range of units within Stage 2 Music.

Society and Culture


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Humanities

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 Humanities

Subject Overview

Society and Culture allows students to explore and analyse the interactions of people, societies, cultures and environments; developing the ability to influence their own futures and participate in contemporary society. The topics in S&C include: Social Ethics, Cultural Diversity, People and Power, Local Tribes, Environmental sustainability, The Role of Media in Society. The study of Society and Culture allows students to focus on a broad variety of interests.

Students undertake study in Stage 1 Society and Culture through the following topics:

Australian Context

  • Pop Culture: An understanding of what past and current popular culture has looked like and how this culture impacts on the values we have today. Students investigate the changing role technology has played in Australian society and the lives of everyday Australians with a particular focus on how technology separates generations.
  • Australians as Global Citizens: Students work in groups to define and investigate different views on Australia’s global connections.  These include Historical connections with the United States and Europe as well as current connections with the Asia/Pacific region.

International Context

  • Media: An understanding of how media has evolved over time and the role that social media is playing in communicating ethical issues across the globe. Students investigate how world events are portrayed by the media and how that influences people’s views of other countries and their values.

Global Issues Analysis

  • Students select a range of articles relating to a global issue and then investigate the issue using Primary and Secondary Sources.

Individual Investigation

  • Students investigate their choice of a contemporary social or cultural issue.  They identify and refine guiding questions and choose, organize and analyze a range of resources on their chosen issue.

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is school-based. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Source Analysis (45%)
Group Activity (25%)
Investigation (30%)

This subject does not include an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Society and Culture include: Society and Culture and Tourism.

Tourism


(2 x 10 Credits, Full Year) Learning Area: Humanities

Pre-requisite Information: At least a “C” grade in Year 10 Humanities

Subject Overview

Tourism allows students to develop an understanding of the nature of tourists, tourism, and the tourism industry including the complex economic, social, cultural and environmental impacts of tourism. Tourism is one of the largest industries in Australia offering employment in a diverse range of areas. The study of tourism allows you to focus on a broad variety of your interests.

This subject consists of the following four themes and five topics:

Practical Skills and Applications
Students will complete three practical modules. The modules offered will be varied across a range of:

Themes

  • Understanding the Tourism Industry
  • Identifying Visitors and Hosts
  • Creating Sustainable Tourism
  • Working in the Tourism Industry

Topics

  • Preparing for International Travel: An understanding of international destinations is developed and includes location and travel considerations, attractions and cultural contrasts.
  • Exploring Tourism in the Local Area: Tourism activities, sites and infrastructure in the local area are explored. Travelling in a local community is considered from the perspective of a tourist or host.
  • Understanding Tourism and Natural Environments: Students investigate the impact of visitors on natural environments and the development of planning guidelines, controls and management strategies.
  • Working in the Tourism Industry: Students investigate and analyse two different careers in the tourism industry.
  • Understanding the Tourism Industry: Students look at a minimum of three tourism providers and evaluate each tour group’s programs for sustainable practices.

Assessment

Stage 1 assessment is school-based. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Case Study (20%)  
Source Analysis (20%)
Practical Activity (30%)
Investigation (30%)

This subject includes an end-of-semester examination.

FURTHER STUDY OPTIONS: Possible Stage 2 study options that can be undertaken following successful completion of Stage 1 Tourism include: Tourism and Society and Culture.

Drama


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Drama

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in a semester of Stage 1 Drama or both semesters of Stage 1 English (English, English Literary Studies or Essential English)

Subject Overview

Stage 2 Drama takes students further on their development of drama skills and ideas. It allows for creativity though the development of a Group Presentation with students undertaking all the elements of putting on a hypothetical production. Live theater is viewed and analyzed to generate reviews that critique the performance. Their performance skills and knowledge are demonstrated through a whole group play and performed to an audience. 

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Drama through the following topics:

Group Presentation

  • Focusing on a particular play students undertake the process of designing a play by selecting one theatre element to focus on such as Costume Design. As a group the presentation is performed and filmed to express the whole plays concept.

Folio

  • Review: Two live theatre productions are viewed and critiqued, focussing on all aspects of the design and overall performance in 1,000 words each.
  • Production Report: At the completion of the performance a report is generated analysing the process and success of the group performance in a 2,000 word report.

Interpretive Study /Unit 3

  • Bertolt Brecht a theatre practitioner is studied in depth, and a report is created using his theatre of war techniques. Addressing one of his famous productions the students create their own production ideas in a 1,500 word report. 

Performance /Unit 4

  • A Group Performance is rehearsed and performed to an audience. Students can select to undertake an on or off stage role. This performance is performed to a large audience and externally moderated.

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Group Presentation (20%)

  • Oral Presentation filmed

Folio (30%)

  • Production Report and Reviews

Interpretive Study Type 3 (20%)

  • Brecht investigation

30% External Assessment:

  • Performance

English


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: English

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in both semesters of Stage 1 English or English Literary Studies

Restrictions: Students can only study one of these subjects at Stage 2 (English, English Literary Studies or Essential English)

Subject Overview

Stage 2 English focuses on the exploration and development of English skills through reading, viewing, writing, speaking and using technology in appropriate ways and for different purposes. Students learn to analyse techniques specific to different genres while making connections between their own personal ideas and beliefs and those explored within the texts. Through the deconstruction of other authors’ creative writing, students develop the skills to compose their own texts. Students learn to compare similar texts and recognise the choices made concerning their purpose, audience, context, form and use of language.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 English through the following topics:

Novel Study

  • Critically analyse a novel, focusson literary techniques and the author’s purpose

Film Study

  • Examine significant key ideas and film techniques to convey key ideas to an audience

Media Study

  • Two examples of the same news item (from any media) are analysed and compared, considering purpose, context, audience and stylistic conventions

Persuasive Speech

  • An argument is developed and presented on a contemporary, contentious issue

Narrative Writing

  • Create a narrative of your own design

Exposition

  • Produce a piece of expository writing, effectively using persuasive techniques and rhetoric

Writer's Statement

  • Students construct a writer’s statement for one or more of the created texts that explains and justifies the creative decisions made in the process of writing one or more of the texts

Comparative Analysis

  • Independent comparative analysis of two texts, evaluating how language and stylistic features contribute to the development of the central themes

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Responding to Texts (30%)

  • Novel Study
  • Film Study 
  • Media Study

Creating Texts (40%)

  • Persuasive Speech
  • Narrative
  • Exposition
  • Writer’s Statement

30% External Assessment:

  • Comparative Analysis

Essential English


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: English

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in both semesters of Stage 1 Essential English, English or English Literary Studies

Restrictions: Students can only study one of these subjects at Stage 2 (English, English Literary Studies or Essential English)

Subject Overview

Essential English focuses on developing each student’s literacy. The teaching material is relevant to everyday contexts. Text analysis tasks aim to develop each student’s critical response to texts and provide stimulus and modelling for text production tasks that are relevant to the student’s world. Students undertake one external assessment, consisting of an independent language study. The primary focus of the study is the use of language by a group of people in a chosen context, which may be local or virtual, and may have national or global connections.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Essential English through the following topics:

Biography

  • Closely explore a biography, focussing on setting, ideas, themes and language

Film Study

  • Critically examine a film, exploring key themes and cinematic techniques used to convey key ideas

Website Review

  • Analyse the use of technique used by a particular website to persuade and influence a customer

Instructional Oral

  • Produce an instructional or procedural text for a specific audience

Restaurant Review

  • Produce a review of a restaurant using Review form and structure

Personal Recount

  • Write a recount on a particular experience

Personal Choice

  • Choose from and complete: a persuasive piece on a particular point of view; entertaining and engaging an audience; or communicating observations or information

Language Study

  • Examine and explore the language used by a group of people in a chosen context

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Responding to Texts (30%)

  • Biography
  • Film Study
  • Website Review

Creating Texts (40%)

  • Instructional Oral
  • Restaurant Review
  • Personal Recount
  • Personal Choice

30% External Assessment:

  • Language Report

English Literary Studies


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: English

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in both semesters of Stage 1 English Literary Studies or at least a B- in both semesters of Stage 1 English

Restrictions: Students can only study one of these subjects at Stage 2 (English, English Literary Studies or Essential English)

Subject Overview

English Literary Studies focuses on the exploration and development of English skills through reading, viewing, writing, speaking, and using technology in appropriate ways and for different purposes. Students learn about the use of language through close readings, both shared and individual, of a range of texts. In comparative exercises students recognised the connections between texts through responses that integrate discussion of texts. By focusing on the creativity and craft of other authors, both classic and contemporary, students develop  skills in composing texts.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 English Literary Studies through the following topics:

Novel Study

  • Closely and critically analyse a novel, exploring how the author uses a range of techniques to explore significant themes and influence the reader’s response.

Play Study

  • Closely and critically analyse a playscript, exploring how the writer uses a range of language and stylistic features to convey significant themes and influence audience reaction.

Poetry

  • Compare and contrast the ways in which two or more poets use various techniques and devices to convey significant ideas and influence reader response

Critical Perspectives Task

  • View and critically analyse a feature film, developing an interpretation shaped by two critical perspectives (eg gender, psychological, post-colonial …)

Transformative Writing

  • Students choose from a wide range of texts and textual forms to create a new text based on their understanding of an existing text studied either in class or individually and will include a Writer’s Statement

Oral or Multimodal Presentation

  • Present an argument or perspective on a contemporary, contentious social issue

Critical Reading Study

  • Preparation for the Exam, critically analysing a range of short texts including media articles, prose, non-fiction and visual

Text Study

  • This response is a 1500 word comparative, critical essay that compares one of the texts studied by the class with another text individually chosen by the student. It is submitted for external assessment.

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Responding to Texts (50%)

  • Novel
  • Play
  • Poetry
  • Critical Perspectives (Film)

Creating Texts (20%)

  • Transformative task
  • Oral or multi-modal task

Individual Study (20%)

30% External Assessment:

  • Text Study
  • Examination: Critical Reading (90 minutes)

Geography


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Humanities

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in a semester of Stage 1 Geography, History or Tourism

Subject Overview

Stage 2 Geography involves the study of the interaction between humans and the environment, and the challenges this presents. They focus on a core topic of population, resources, and development, completing folio tasks and an examination on this content. Students also conduct individual investigations into option topics such as Climate Change, Sources of Energy, Coasts or Urbanisation. These independent investigations develop research skills and fieldwork techniques such as gathering, reporting, and analysing data.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Geography through the following topics:

This subject consists of a Core Topic and Option Topics.

Core Topic: Population, Resources and Development

  • This topic introduces students to the processes and factors involved in population change. Students develop and understanding of world population patterns and global consumption patterns. Throughout this topic students investigate contemporary population issues using local, national and global case studies, and become familiar with issues relating to the use of resources such as water. They learn a wide range of research and data analysis skills.

Option Topic

  • The aim is to enable students to develop the skills and knowledge described in the learning requirements for Geography, which are then assessed using the assessment design criteria in the individual fieldwork report and the inquiry.

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

School Based (70%)

Fieldwork (25%)

  • This assesses the students’ ability to plan, organise and carry out fieldwork based on one of the Option Topics. The report will be a maximum of 1800 words or a maximum of 11 minutes for an oral presentation.

Inquiry (20%)

  • This involves investigation of a geographical issue relating to the Second Option topic and its presentation in one of a variety of formats up to a maximum of 1500 words or a maximum of 10 minutes for an oral presentation.

Folio (25%)

  • Students undertake a planned program of four to six group and individual assessments for the folio. When working in a group, each student is assessed individually and must provide evidence of his or her learning against the performance standards.
  • The set of group and individual assessments will be a maximum of 2000 words if written or a maximum of 12 minutes if presented orally.

External Examination (30%)

  • This two-hour examination will focus on the core topic and includes short answer and extended answer questions testing knowledge, skills, application and the analysis of issues.

Biology


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Science

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in a semester of Stage 1 Biology, Chemistry or Physics.

Subject Overview

Stage 2 Biology students study the cellular and overall structures and functions of a range of organisms, such as how those organisms gain nutrition and reproduce and how they live in a variety of ecological habitats. This study enables students to understand the structure and function of living things and how they interact within their own species, other species and their environments. Through Biology, students increase their knowledge of principles and concepts, developing their ability to use that knowledge to identify questions, issues, opportunities, which challenges them to gain new knowledge through their own investigations.
Students undertake study in Stage 2 Biology through the following topics:

Cells

  • Organelles and their function, transport across the cell membrane to maintain stable environment, mitosis and cell culturing

Macromolecules

  • Proteins and their function, enzymes, lipids, polysaccharides, nucleic acids and protein synthesis, genetic engineering

Organisms

  • Hormonal and nervous communication focus on regulation of body temperature, exchange surfaces in the body, meiosis,

Ecosystems

  • Energy flow, resources, succession, natural selection, human impact on the environment

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:
70% School Based Assessment:

Investigations Folio (40%)

  • Practical Investigations with written reports
  • Issues Investigation (choice of own topic, in form of Oral Presentation or Essay)

Skills and Applications Tasks (30%)

  • Oral Presentation
  • Assignment
  • Topic Tests

30% External Assessment:

  • 3 hour examination set by SACE Board

Chemistry


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: English

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in both semesters of Stage 1 Chemistry.

Subject Overview

Studying Stage 2 Chemistry assists students to appreciate the factors that influence science to make informed decisions about modifying and interacting with nature. Students will continue studying atomic structure and reactions in combination with learning the properties of common materials and resources. How these are utilised and the impact chemical processes have on the environment is also a focus. Through the study of chemistry, students develop an understanding of the physical world enabling them to be questioning, reflective and critical thinkers using their chemistry knowledge to explore and explain experiences of phenomena around them.  Students undertake study in Stage 2 Chemistry through the following topics:

Elemental and Environmental Chemistry

  • Atomic structure and the Periodic Table, bonding and molecular shapes, cycles in nature, photochemical smog

Analytical Techniques

  • Chromatography, AAS, stoichiometry and titration procedures

Using and Controlling Reactions

  • Enthalpy and fuels, collision theory and rate of reaction, equilibrium, electrochemistry and metal production

Organic and Biological Chemistry

  • Hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and esters, practical procedures

Materials

  • Natural and synthetic polymers, proteins and silicates

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Investigation Folio (40%)

  • Practical Investigations with written reports
  • Issues Investigation (choice of own topic, in form of Oral Presentation or Essay)

Skills and Applications Tasks (30%)

  • Topic Tests
  • Oral Presentation

30% External Assessment:

  • 3 hour examination set by SACE Board

Child Studies


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Food and Hospitality

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in a semester of Stage 1 Child Studies or Food & Hospitality or both semesters of Stage 1 English (English, English Literary Studies or Essential English)

Subject Overview

Students gain an understanding of children through individual, collaborative and practical learning. Areas of development, child needs, nutrition, literacy, disability and equity are explored.  Government laws and initiatives in relation to children’s protection, health and well-being have also been critiqued. Students analysed contemporary issues and current trends, developing their research, literacy and analytical skills. A range of practical skills are further enhanced in the areas of management, organisation, use of resources and occupational health and safety requirements for working with children.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Child Studies through the following topics:

Pre-Natal Development

  • Dietary factors that can influence the overall health of a fetus, research, design, produce, action plan, nutrition, wellbeing of mother, unborn child
  • Hospital Gift
  • Investigate, develop knowledge of the physical and emotional needs of children in hospital, well being, action plan, evaluation

Special Needs

  • Contemporary issues of children’s special needs, support services, well-being of children, accessibility, design, create a learning aid/tool

Healthy Canteen

  • Develop two nutritious food products and a drink, Collaboration, Appropriate recipe selection, selection of design, materials for packaging

Story Book

  • Investigate contemporary issues with children reading, to create a storybook that addresses trends, issues related to the health and well being of children, evaluate, produce a story book

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Practical Activity (50%)

  • Action Plan or Research Task
  • Practical Application
  • Individual Evaluation

Group Activity (20%)

  • Group decision-making
  • Group practical application
  • Collaboration
  • An individual evaluation report

30% External Assessment:

  • Individual Investigation on an area of study and personal interest, marked by the SACE Board

Food and Hospitality


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Food and Hospitality

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in a semester of Stage 1 Child Studies or Food & Hospitality or both semesters of Stage 1 English (English, English Literary Studies or Essential English)

Subject Overview

Students examine the dynamic nature of the food and hospitality industry, understanding contemporary approaches and issues. They develop individual practical skills using technology in the preparation and handling of food. Practical tasks include High Tea, Pies and Pastry and Artisan food. Students also work collaboratively to complete Group tasks. A 2000 word individual investigation on a topic of interest is undertaken as the external component.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Food and Hospitality through the following topics:

Artisan Food

  • Develop knowledge of the small ‘artisan’ food production sector, how they gain entry into the market.  Labelling and packaging of food products for sale in this environment.

Group Catering

  • Plan a catering task based on the ideas of sustainability, and the use of local and seasonal produce, while supporting healthy eating practices

Healthy Food Fast

  • Contemporary trends in Food and Hospitality Industry, responses to consumers’ food production knowledge and skills, action plan, how technology is utilised

High Tea

  • Food safety and hygiene as related to the Food and Hospitality Industry, incorporate high risk ingredients – suitable for a ‘High Tea’ service

Pies and Pastry

  • Influence of Australia’s diverse cultures on the Food and Hospitality Industry, produce a ‘pie’ representative of a culture

Social Media

  • Influence of the Internet on the Food and Hospitality Industry, produce a ‘replica’ or an ‘interpretation’ of a dish from a high end establishment, suitable to be used as the showpiece on an Internet advertising site

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Group Activity (20%)

  • Group Decision Making
  • Group Practical Application
  • Individual Evaluation Report

Practical Activity (50%)

  • Problem solving
  • Practical application
  • Individual evaluation report

30% External Assessment:

  • Individual Investigation identifying a topic relating to an area of study and the Food and Hospitality Industry, marked by the SACE Board.

Physical Education


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Health and Physical Education

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in both semesters of Stage 1 Physical Education.

Subject Overview

Students gain an understanding of human functioning and physical activity, and an awareness of the community structures and practices that influence participation in physical activity. They explore their own physical capacities through completion of three practical units and analyse performance, health, and lifestyle issues through completion of an Issues Analysis. Students develop knowledge and understanding in a range of theory topics such as Energy systems and how these enable our body to function within a range of physical activities. Students develop skills in communication, investigation, and the ability to apply knowledge to practical situations.
Students undertake study in Stage 2 Physical Education through the following topics:

Energy Systems

  • ATP, sources of nutrients, Aerobic and Anaerobic Energy production, contribution of energy Systems for specific activities

Skill Acquisition

  • Classification of skills, characteristics of skilled performer, information processing model, stages of learning

Training Methods and Principles

  • What are the different training methods and how do we apply them for a specific sport/training session

Acute and Chronic responses of the Body

  • Short and long term responses of the body to exercise within the circulatory, respiratory and muscular systems

Biomechanics of the Body

  • Motion, Speed and velocity, summation of forces, newtons laws of motion, balance and stability

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Practical (50%)
Students undertake three Practicals - balanced across a range of individual, team, racket and aquatic activities - of equal importance. All Practicals must be from the SACE Board’s register of centrally developed Practicals

  • Kayaking
  • Touch Football
  • Table Tennis

Folio (20%)

  • Topic Tests
  • Integrated Tasks- Assignments
  • Issues Analysis

30% External Assessment:

  • 2 hour examination set by SACE Board

Physics


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Science

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in both semesters of Stage 1 Physics.

Subject Overview

Stage 2 Physics students develop their knowledge of the principles and concepts of Physics, and the ability to use that knowledge to formulate questions, hypotheses, and identify opportunities. Students continue studying the classical laws governing motion alongside the modern physics theory regarding electricity, magnetism, light and nuclear radiation. They develop the ability to observe, record and explain the phenomena of Physics and how to interpret investigations. Through Physics investigation they acquire and apply new knowledge and develop literacy skills.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Physics through the following topics:

Motion in 2D

  • Projectile Motion applied to sports projectiles, Circular Motion applied to the banking of road curves, Gravitation and Satellites, Momentum in Two Dimensions applied to spacecraft propulsion systems.

Electricity and Magnetism

  • Electric Fields applied to photocopiers and printers, Motion of Charged particles in Electric and Magnetic Fields applied to cyclotrons, Magnetic Fields applied to Moving Coil Loudspeakers, Motion of Charged particles in Magnetic Fields

Light and Matter

  • Electromagnetic Waves are applied to Laser Airborne Depth Sounders (LADS), The Interference of Light applied to CDs, Photons are applied to the use of X-rays, Wave Behaviour of Particles applied to the Electron Microscope

Atoms and Nuclei

  • The Atom applied to the Laser, The Structure of the Nucleus is applied to medical radioisotopes, Radioactivity applied to positron emission tomography (PET), Nuclear Fission and Fusion is applied to Nuclear Fission Reactors

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Investigations Folio (40%)

  • Practical Investigations with written reports
  • Issues Investigation (choice of own topic, in form of Oral Presentation or Essay)

Skills and Applications Tasks 2 (30%)

  • Topic Tests

30% External Assessment:

  • 3 hour examination set by SACE Board

Religion Studies


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Humanities

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in Stage 1 Religion Studies

Subject Overview

Students will gain a deeper understanding of the nature of religion and spirituality.  They study two traditions in depth: Christianity and Judaism.

Students develop their knowledge and understanding of world religions as well as skills in the following areas: investigation and application; communication; reflection and analysis and evaluation.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Religion Studies through the following topics:

Overview of Religion

The core topic provides students with an overview of religion and the study of religions and spiritualities, and gives a general introduction to the study of individual religious traditions. The core topic consists of three key areas of study:

  • What is religion? What is spirituality?
  • What are the key phenomena that make up religion?
  • How are secular culture and religious culture linked?

Christianity

  • Overview of Christian beliefs and practices, contemporary Christian ethics, the role of women in Christianity

Judaism

  • Overview of Jewish beliefs and practices, Jewish festivals and holy days, the laws of kashrut

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Folio (40%)

  • Ethics magazine article
  • Evaluating definitions of religion essay
  • Jewish festivals essay
  • Kosher laws reflection

Sources Analysis (30%)

  • The place of women in the church sources analysis
  • Rituals sources analysis

30% External Assessment:

  • 2000 word individual investigation of a student directed question

Research Project


(1 x 10 Credits, Half Year) Learning Area: Cross Discplinary Studies

Pre-requisite Information: Nil

Subject Overview

The Research Project provides a valuable opportunity for SACE students to develop and demonstrate skills essential for learning and living in a changing world. It enables students to develop vital planning, research, synthesis, evaluation, and project management skills.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Research Project through the following topics:

Initiate and Plan their Research

  • Students plan their research by making decisions, seeking help, responding to and creating opportunities, and solving problems.

Develop their Research

  • Students develop a capability or capabilities in ways that are relevant to their research question, apply specific knowledge and skills and develop and explore ideas.

Produce and Substantiate their Research Outcome

  • Students synthesise their key findings (knowledge, skills, and ideas) to produce a research outcome.

Evaluate their Research

  • Students explain the choice of research processes used and evaluate the usefulness of the research processes specific to the research question and evaluate the quality of the research outcome

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Folio (30%)

  • Preliminary ideas and research proposal, research development and discussion (10 pages)

Outcome (40%)

  • A maximum of 2000 words if written OR a maximum of 12 minutes for an oral presentation

30% External Assessment:

Evaluation

  • A 150-word written summary and a 1500-word evaluation of the research process

Scientific Studies


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Science

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in a semester of Stage 1 Scientific Studies, Biology, Chemistry or Physics.

Subject Overview

Stage 2 Scientific Studies students develop their knowledge of scientific concepts, the ability to use that knowledge to identify issues, and the capacity to acquire new knowledge through their own investigations. Students develop the skills and abilities to explain scientific phenomena and to draw evidence-based conclusions. This is undertaken through the study of four main topics: Space; DNA and Genetics; Health, Disease and Medicine; and Human Life: Birth to Death. Students take an inquire-based approach to their work, gathering information, evaluating evidence, gaining new knowledge, and applying their learning to related ideas and issues.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Scientific Studies through the following topics:

Scientific Skills

  • Experimental design, reporting, analysis and data interpretation, leading to external practical design and completion

Health Disease and Medicine

  • Common diseases to do with nutrition, study of the medical profession

Birth to Death

  • The main events of development of baby, from child to teenager, puberty and common causes of death

Genetics

  • DNA and its structure, genetics and punnet squares

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Investigations Folio (40%)

  • Practical Investigations with written reports
  • Research Investigations
  • Issues Investigation

Skills and Applications Tasks (30%)

  • Written Assignments
  • Oral Presentations
  • Practical Tasks

30% External Assessment:

  • 2000 word Practical Design and Investigation

Integrated Learning - Sports Studies


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Health and Physical Education

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in a semester of Stage 1 Sports Studies, Physical Education or both semesters of Stage 1 English (English, English Literary Studies or Essential English)

Subject Overview

Students explore their own physical capabilities through practical units of Badminton, Netball and Lawn Bowls analysing their technique and application of tactical strategy. Students develop an awareness of community and global structures and practices influencing physical activity. Students showcase an understanding around coaching principles demonstrating their application through running a Netball coaching program for Primary Aged students. Students develop a folio of work to support their round-table discussion on the depth, extent, and focus of the learning that has taken place throughout the year.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Subject through the following topics:

Badminton

  • Overhead clear, drop shot, smash, net roll and application to singles and doubles games

Lawn Bowls

  • Forehand and backhand draw, drive, tactical and strategic awareness

Netball

  • Passing, shooting, offensive and defensive movement

Netball Coaching

  • Develop and apply their coaching skills through a four session netball coaching program

Lawn Bowls SEPEP

  • Plan and implement a Lawn Bowls tournament in groups.

Folio Tasks

  • Reflect on elements of the course and sport in general such as project planning, coaching principles, skill acquisition, wellbeing, end of year summary.

Individual Project

  • Investigate and present information on a topic of the student’s choice that relates to sport, fitness or health.

Group Activity

  • Students work collaboratively in a group to plan, organise, and implement a Netball coaching program, as well as a SEPEP Lawn Bowls tournament. Students reflect on their contribution and on the collaborative processes and outcomes.

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Practical (30%)

  • Students demonstrate Practical Skills and Application whilst showcasing the ability to reflect and evaluate their own and others learning. Possible sports include: Badminton, Netball, Lawn Bowls

Group Activity (20%)

  • Students work collaboratively in a group to plan, organise, and implement a practical and / or theoretical task or project. Students reflect on their contribution and on the collaborative processes and outcomes. Possible activity- Netball Coaching, Lawn Bowls SEPEP

Folio and Discussion (20%)

  • Folio: Students develop a folio to support their round-table discussion on the depth, extent, and focus of the learning that has taken place. In developing the folio, students reflect on project planning, coaching principles, skill acquisition and wellbeing and include materials that demonstrate significant personal learning.
  • Discussion: Students participate in a round-table discussion with their teacher and class group (or other designated group) about the learning program. Students are required to articulate the depth, extent, and focus of the learning that has taken place. Students support their views with the evidence in their folio. Each student responds to questions asked by the teacher that allow his or her learning to be assessed (the learning is demonstrated by the evidence in the folio).

30% External Assessment:

  • Students complete a Personal Project on an area of individual interest.

History


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Humanities

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in a semester of Stage 1 Geography or History

Subject Overview

Students of History have the opportunity to make sense of an increasingly complex and rapidly changing world by connecting the past and the present. History involves the investigation of human experience over time. By studying past events, actions, and phenomena, students gain an insight into human nature and the ways in which individuals and societies function. Areas of study are the Rise of Dictators in the 20th Century, the French Revolution and an Individual essay.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Modern History through the following topics:

Thematic study: Revolutions and Turmoil: Social and Political Upheavals c.1500
The French Revolution:

  • Pre-Revolutionary Society: Did Marie Antoinette really suggest the breadless peasants just eat cake?
  • Revolution: how did the lower classes use pitch forks to overthrow an absolute monarchy?
  • Creating a new society: How did a monstrous killing machine, the guillotine, become part of everyday life in France?
  • Maintaining order: How did the construction of a democracy result in a reign of terror?

Depth Study: an Age of Catastrophes: Depression, Dictators and the Second World War

  • The Great Depression: How did a bad week on the stock market result in societal ruin?
  • The Rise of Hitler: How did a failed artist rise to be a dictator of Germany?
  • Life under Nazi Rule: Was it really all terror and fear?
  • World War II: How did Churchill outmanoeuvre Hitler on so many fronts?

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Folio (50%)

  • Six assessment tasks that focus on student ability to demonstrate the following skills: research, synthesis, analysis of source and argument designed to develop and evaluate students’ knowledge and historical literacy skills.

Essay (20%)

  • One essay that provides students with the opportunity to engage in the process of inquiry and enables them to pursue a historic topic that is of personal academic interest. Students formulate a hypothesis and guiding question in order to closely analyse an aspect of history.

External Examination (30%)
A three-hour examination set by the SACE Board that is designed to test students’ abilities to work independently to demonstrate their understanding of content, skills and processes. This is in three parts:

  1. Thematic Study Essay
  2. Depth Study Essay
  3. Source Analysis

Music


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Music

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in both semesters of Stage 1 Music

Subject Overview

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Music through two of the three following options:

Solo Performance

Students develop skills on a chosen instrument or voice, leading to solo performances of:

  • Works of contrasting character;
  • Works that allow students to develop their performance techniques;
  • A minimum of 18 minutes of repertoire.

Ensemble Performance

  • Students develop skills and perform as a member of an ensemble, preparing a minimum of 20 minutes of repertoire.

Individual Study

Students negotiate a topic under one of the following broad headings;

  • Tutoring
  • Community
  • Musical instrument
  • Music and cultures
  • Music industry

This is then submitted to the SACE Board for approval before students begin a significant, individualised study culminating in the presentation of a Folio, Product and Report.

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Solo Performance or Ensemble Performance:

First Performance (30%)
Second Performance (40%)

External Assessment: Final Performance (30%)

Individual Study: Folio (30%) & Product (40%)

External Assessment Report (30%)

Society and Culture


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Humanities

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in a semester of Stage 1 Society & Culture, Geography, History, Tourism or both semesters of Stage 1 English (English, English Literary Studies or Essential English)

Subject Overview

Students explore and analyse the interactions between people, societies, cultures and environments. Using an interdisciplinary approach, they analyse the structures and systems of contemporary societies and cultures. Society and Culture gives students critical insight into the significance of factors such as gender, ethnicity, racism, class, and power structures that affect the lives and identities of individuals and groups. Areas of study are A Question of Rights, Youth Culture and Social Ethics.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Society and Culture through the following topics:

Youth Culture

  • What is youth culture and why are youth so different from adults?
  • Is there just one youth culture?
  • Does the community embrace or isolate youth?
  • What facilities are allocated to youth within Playford and are they adequate?

Social Ethics

  • How are social ethics formed?
  • What social ethical topics are currently being debated in Australia?
  • What people and organisations influence ethical issues?
  • Case studies, a contemporary ethical issue in Australian society.

Human Rights

  • What are human rights and who enforces them?
  • Are human rights being followed on a national and global scale?
  • What organisations aid in securing human rights and are they successful?
  • Have we become so focussed on capitalisation that human rights are dictated by big business?

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Stage 2 assessment is both school-based and externally assessed. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

School Based (70%):

Folio (50%)

  • Assessment pieces that focus on a student’s ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of each of the content topics and develop analysis and evaluation skills.

Interaction (20%)

  • Oral Task(s): Students will engage in an oral presentation on a chosen content topic. Debates with other class members on the content topic of Social Ethics.
  • Group Task: Students will work in a small group to develop and undertake a social action of their choice.

External Assessment (30%)

  • Investigation: Students will undertake a 2000-word assignment on a free choice contemporary social issue. Students will have an opportunity to demonstrate their analytical, research and evaluation skills in completing this task.

Tourism


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Humanities

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in a semester of Stage 1 Tourism, Geography, History or both semesters of Stage 1 English (English, English Literary Studies or Essential English)

Subject Overview

Tourism allows students to develop an understanding of the nature of tourists, tourism, and the tourism industry including the complex economic, social, cultural and environmental impacts of tourism.

Tourism is one of the largest industries in Australia offering employment in a diverse range of areas. The study of tourism allows you to focus on a broad variety of your interests.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Tourism through the following topics: 

This subject consists of themes and topics and practical tourism skills.

Themes

  • Operations and Structures of the Industry
  • Travellers’ Perceptions, and the Interaction of
  • Host Community and Visitor
  • Planning for and Managing Sustainable Tourism
  • Evaluating the Nature of Work in the Tourism Industry

Topics

  • Indigenous People and Tourism: This topic considers the use and abuse of ‘indigenous’ label, and assesses the value of tourism to indigenous populations in various parts of the world.
  • Marketing Tourism: The main purpose of marketing research is to understand consumer behaviour and identify the demand for destinations and activities by particular age groups, socio- economic groups, and interest groups.
  • Responsible Travel: The students discuss planning and preparing for travel, and the responsibilities of travellers, including ethical behaviour towards the host community and environment.

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

School-Based (70%)

  • Stage 2 assessment is both school-based and externally examined. 

Folio (20%)

  • Students interpret and critically analyse secondary sources of information in a tourism context appropriate to the themes or topics being studied. Recommended length of critical analysis is a maximum of 1000 words for a written text or 6 minutes maximum for an individual oral presentation.

Practical Activity (25%)

  • These tasks give students the opportunity to work in and beyond the classroom to develop the skills that can be applied in Tourism activities and industries.

Investigation (25%)

  • Students will be required to undertake independent research into a contemporary issue in Tourism and present their findings in an investigative report, which is 1500 words or a maximum of 10 minutes for an individual oral presentation.

External Examination (30%)

  • Students undertake a two hour examination, applying their tourism knowledge, understanding, and skills to interpret, compare, and analyse sources of information about tourism, based on the four themes.

Essential Mathematics


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Mathematics

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in both semesters of Stage 1 Essential Mathematics, General Mathematics or Mathematical Methods

Restrictions: Students can only study one of these subjects at Stage 2 (Essential Mathematics, General Mathematics or
Mathematical Methods)

Subject Overview

Essential Mathematics offers senior secondary students the opportunity to extend their mathematical skills in ways that apply to practical problem-solving in everyday and workplace contexts. Students apply their mathematics to diverse settings, including everyday calculations, financial management, business applications, measurement and geometry, and statistics in social contexts.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Essential Mathematics through the following topics:

Scales, Plans and Models

  • Students extend their understanding of the properties of plane shapes and solids, and construct the nets of a range of three-dimensional shapes. They use scaled representations such as maps, plans, and three-dimensional models to determine full-scale measurements in practical contexts. Students develop practical skills in measuring and scaling down to create their own maps, scaled plans, or models

Measurement

  • Students extend the concepts Stage 1 to include practical problems in two dimensions involving circles, polygons, and composite shapes, and in three dimensions involving cones, cylinders, pyramids, and spheres.
  • Through the study of Pythagoras’ theorem and the trigonometry of right and non-right triangles, students solve for unknown sides and angles in triangle problems posed in everyday and workplace contexts. Students solve problems involving the calculation of volume, mass, and density posed in practical contexts.

Business Applications

  • In setting up and running a business there are several considerations: the location and spatial requirements of the premises; pricing policies and a mathematical analysis of their impact on the profitability of the business; the impact of taxation, depending on the business structure. Students investigate these physical and financial planning aspects of a small business.

Statistics

  • Students consider the collection of data through various methods of sampling. Emphasis is placed on the importance of eliminating bias and ensuring the validity and reliability of results used from the sample. Compare two or more sets of data examining a single variable, from the same or similar populations, using calculated statistics and graphical representations.
    Use linear regression techniques to investigate the relationship between two variable characteristics. Analyse data graphically and algebraically to determine the strength and nature of the relationship and use it, where appropriate, to make predictions.

Investments and Loans

  • Students investigate a range of ways of investing and borrowing money. The simple and compound interest calculations from Stage 1are extended by seeking the best return on a lump-sum investment. Students consider the effects of taxation and inflation on the investment return.
  • Annuity calculations are developed by considering that investing generally involves making regular deposits into an account, and borrowing requires regular repayments of a loan.

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Skills and Application Tasks (30%)

  • Students undertake four Skills and Application tasks in the form of topic tests.
  • The equivalent of one Skills and Application test will be undertaken without the use of notes or a calculator

Folio (40%)

  • Students will undertake three Folios. Students are required to investigate mathematical relationships, concepts, or problems, which may be set in an applied context.

30% External Assessment:

  • A two-hour examination set by SACE that is designed to test students’ abilities to work independently to demonstrate their understanding of content, skills and process. The topics of Measurement, Statistics and Investments and Loans are examinable.

Mathematical Methods


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Mathematics

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in both semesters of Stage 1 Mathematical Methods.

Restrictions: Students can only study one of these subjects at Stage 2 (Essential Mathematics, General Mathematics or
Mathematical Methods)

Subject Overview

Mathematical Methods develops an increasingly complex and sophisticated understanding of calculus and statistics. By using functions and their derivatives and integrals, and by mathematically modelling physical processes, students develop a deep understanding of the physical world through a sound knowledge of relationships involving rates of change. Students use statistics to describe and analyse phenomena that involve uncertainty and variation.

Mathematical Methods provides the foundation for further study in mathematics, economics, computer sciences, and the sciences. It prepares students for courses and careers that may involve the use of statistics, such as health or social sciences.
Students undertake study in Stage 2 Mathematical Methods through the following topics:

Further Differentiation and Applications

  • Students gain a conceptual grasp of calculus, and the ability to use its techniques in applications. This is achieved by working with various kinds of mathematical models in different situations, which provide a context for investigating and analysing the mathematical function behind the mathematical model.

Logarithmic Function

  • The study of calculus continues from Stage 1 Mathematics with the derivatives of exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their applications, together with differentiation techniques and applications to optimisation problems and graph sketching.

Integral Calculus

  • Calculus concludes with the study of integration. This topic is considered both as a process that reverses differentiation and as a way of calculating areas. The fundamental theorem of calculus as a link between differentiation and integration is emphasised.

Discrete Random Variables

  • The study of statistics enables students to describe and analyse phenomena that involve uncertainty and variation. This topic focuses on quantitative variables that allow mathematical analysis of the distribution, in particular the mean and standard deviation. At this stage it is important to differentiate between discrete and continuous random variables. The use of a probability distribution of a discrete random variable is used to determine the probabilities from relative frequencies and probability bar charts.

Continuous Random Variables and the Normal Distribution

  • Students investigate the properties and usefulness of the normal distribution in different contexts. Extensive use of electronic technology is used to calculate proportions or probabilities within the normal distribution. Comparisons of different normal distributions is developed through an understanding of the standard normal distribution and the use of Z scores.

Sampling and Confidence Intervals

  • Students learn about the importance of sampling as a representation of the population being investigated. They explore the effects of sample size and population composition. Students also develop an understanding of the importance of sampling in statistical decision-making.

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Skills and Applications Tasks (50%)

  • Students undertake six Skills and Application tasks in the form of topic tests.
  • The equivalent of one Skills and Application test will be undertaken without the use of notes or a calculator

Mathematical Investigation (20%)

  • Students will undertake one Mathematical Investigations. Students are required to investigate mathematical relationships, concepts, or problems, which may be set in an applied context.

External Assessment (30%)

  • A three-hour examination set by SACE that is designed to test students’ abilities to work independently to demonstrate their understanding of content, skills and process. All topics are examinable.

General Mathematics


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Mathematics

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in both semesters of  Stage 1 General Mathematics or Mathematical Methods

Restrictions: Students can only study one of these subjects at Stage 2 (Essential Mathematics, General Mathematics or
Mathematical Methods)

Subject Overview

General Mathematics extends students’ mathematical skills in ways that apply to practical problem-solving. A problem-based approach is integral to the development of mathematical models and the associated key concepts in the topics. These topics cover a diverse range of applications of mathematics, including personal financial management, the statistical investigation process, modelling using linear and non-linear functions, and discrete modelling using networks and matrices.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 General Mathematics through the following topics:

Modelling with Linear Relationships

  • Students review concepts of continuous linear functions and extend their understanding through the solutions of problems involving simultaneous equations. Linear programming is introduced as a major application of linear functions.

Modelling with Matrices

  • Students investigate the physical and financial planning of a small business, including pricing calculations, depreciation, insurance, taxation and the concept of breakeven.

Statistical Models

  • Linear and exponential growth behaviours are observed in bivariate. By using electronic technology and statistical tools, students find algebraic models and use them for predictive purposes.

Financial Models

  • The focus of this topic is on the annuity model and its applications to investing and borrowing money. Students investigate the different types of saving plans and consider the effects of bank and government charges, taxation and inflation. They discuss mortgages, personal loans, pension annuities and interest- interest only loans with sinking funds.

Discrete Models

  • The focus of this topic is on network applications to the solution of problems involving critical path analysis and assignment problems. To demonstrate the diversity off discrete models, students investigate assignment problems and learn the application of the Hungarian algorithm to their solution.

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Skills and Applications Tasks (40%)

  • Students undertake five Skills and Application tasks in the form of topic tests.
  • The equivalent of one Skills and Application test will be undertaken without the use of notes or a calculator

Mathematical Investigation (30%)

  • Students will undertake two Mathematical Investigations. Students are required to investigate mathematical relationships, concepts, or problems, which may be set in an applied context.

External Assessment (30%):

  • A two-hour examination set by SACE that is designed to test students’ abilities to work independently to demonstrate their understanding of content, skills and process. The examinable topics are Statistical Models, Discrete Models and Financial Models.

Visual Art


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Visual Art

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in a semester in Stage 1 Visual Art.

Subject Overview

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Visual Art through the following topics:

Folio

  • The ‘Folio’ is the main focus. This is a collection of each students’ own original ideas and explorations.
  • Students produce one Folio of forty A3 pages documenting their Visual Learning in support of their two Practical works of art.
  • Students choose the idea focus and direction for both Practical’s.
  • Visual thinking skills are integral to the creative or problem solving process for artists and designers.

Practical

  • Students produce two final artworks or ‘Practical’s’. There must be two resolved works or a body of work. Production of the work must involve the application of technical skills.

Visual artworks can be resolved using various practical genres which may include:

  • Video, installation, assemblage, digital imaging, painting, drawing, mixed media, printmaking, wood, plastic, sculpture and ceramics.

Practitioner’s Statement

  • Students write two written statements (500 words each) for each of their resolved Practical’s. If students choose the body of work option, the statement is 1000 words. They will evaluate their work, explain the idea, processes affecting outcomes, influences and connections with other practitioners and generally provide insight into how processes have shaped their outcome.

Visual Study

  • The ‘Visual Study’ is the main focus. A Visual Study is an exploration of, or experimentation with, one or more styles, ideas, concepts, media, techniques or technologies based on research and analysis of the work of other practitioners.
  • Students decide the focus and topic of their Visual Study. They submit twenty A3 pages (or equivalent) of practical study and research integrated with no more than 2000 words or 12 minutes of recorded oral presentation.
  • Students are obliged to attend organised Art excursions.

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Folio (40%)

  • Folio – 40 A3 pages

Practical (30%)

  • Two practical’s or a body of work
  • Two Practitioner’s statements 500 words each or one Practitioner’s statement 1000 words

30% External Assessment:

Visual Study (30%)

  • 20 A3 pages with 2000 words embedded

Indonesian


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Languages

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in both semesters of Stage 1 Indonesian

Subject Overview

Students continue to develop and apply their intercultural language skills to interact orally with others to exchange information, ideas, opinions, and experiences in Indonesian on a variety of topics within the three themes, The Indonesian-Speaking Community, The Individual and The Changing World. They produce a variety of written texts in Indonesian for specific audiences, purposes and contexts expressing information, feelings, ideas, and opinions on a range of issues. Students analyse aural, written and audio-visual texts exploring their linguistic and cultural richness and respond in detail to questions about the texts. Active reflection examining the relationships between language, culture and identity, and the ways in which culture influences communication is core.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Indonesian (continuers) through the following topics:

The Role of Women in Indonesian Society

  • Students examine the changing roles of women in Indonesian society. They research key female figures and explore Indonesian narratives written by women.

Poverty and Wealth

  • Students explore the poverty and wealth dichotomy that exists in Indonesia. They consider the impacts of political and public policy and the social needs of the two classes.

World of Work

  • Students immerse themselves in an imagined experience as a labour worker in Indonesia. They consider the practical and emotional elements of life as a lower class citizen and develop a sense of empathy.

Religious Diversity in Indonesia

  • Students explore the 6 recognised religions in Indonesia and examine in depth the role of religion in modern day society.

Teenage Life

  • Students discover what it means to be a teenager in Indonesian society. They explore the issues affecting their peers and compare and contrast these with those Australian teenagers deal with.

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Folio (50%)

  • Text Production
  • Text Analysis
  • Oral Interaction

In-depth Study (20%)

  • Writing in Indonesian
  • Oral Presentation
  • Reflection in English

30% External Assessment:

The External Assessment consists of two parts:

Oral Examination: 10 – 15 minutes in two parts:

  • Conversation: 5-7 minute conversation about the personal world of the student i.e. life, family and friends, interests, aspirations etc.
  • Discussion: 5-8 minute discussion about the topic of the individual student’s in-depth study.

Written Examination: (3 Hours)

  • Section One - Listening and Responding: Students listen and analyse 5-7 texts spoken in Indonesian and respond to questions in English or Indonesian as directed.
  • Section Two - Reading and Responding A & B: Students read and analyse various texts written in Indonesian and respond to questions in English or Indonesian as directed.
  • Section Three - Writing in Indonesian: Students make a selection from a choice of questions and write a 250-300 word response in Indonesian

Workplace Practices


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Business Enterprise & Technology

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in a semester of Stage 1 Workplace Practices or both semesters of Stage 1 English (English, English Literary Studies or Essential English)

Subject Overview

Students develop knowledge, skills & understanding of the nature, type & structure of the workplace. They explore the relationship between the changing nature of work, industrial relations influences & workplace issues. Students develop skills and understanding to be able to explain concepts of industry and work. They analyse the relationships between work-related issues and practices in workplaces and demonstrate knowledge of the roles of individuals, government legislation and policies, unions, and employer groups in work-related and workplace issues. Students investigate the dynamic nature of work-related and workplace issues, cultures, and/or environments locally, nationally, and/or globally. They demonstrate and apply generic work skills and, where relevant, industry knowledge and skills, in a workplace and/or work-related context.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Workplace Practices through the following topics:

Industry and Work Knowledge

  • Students develop knowledge and understanding of the nature, type, and structure of the workplace.
  • They learn about the relationship between work-related issues and practices; the changing nature of work; industrial relations influences and workplace issues.

Vocational Learning

  • Students undertake learning in the workplace to develop and reflect on their capabilities, interests, and aspirations and to reflect on the knowledge, skills, and attributes valued in the workplace.

VET (Vocational Education and Training)

  • Students undertake learning about how VET includes any ‘training and assessment delivered by a registered training organisation which meets the requirements specified in national industry/enterprise Training Packages or in accredited courses

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Folio (25%)

  • An investigation of an issue or a trend
  • A practical or skills demonstration
  • A project
  • An oral presentation

Performance (25%)

  • 60 hours of working experience/placement

Reflection (20%)

  • Reflection on personal graduate qualities
  • Written reflection on the working experience

30% External Assessment:

  • Practical or issue investigation

Material Products


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Business Enterprise & Technology

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in a semester of Stage 1 Material Products

Subject Overview

Students demonstrate their design and technological ability through activities in contexts that have a practical outcome. They develop the ability to initiate, create and develop products in response to a design brief and evaluate the process and final product. Based on their testing and understanding of the physical properties and working characteristics of materials, students make sound decisions about materials and techniques and develop skills to competently use tools and materials safely. Students analyse the impacts of technology on individuals and the environment related to their product material.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Material Products through the following topics:

Skills and Application

  • Students develop knowledge and understanding of safe work practices and methods for both hand and machine joint and product construction.
  • Students research material properties and design testing methods to determine best material choices for the major product

Product

  • Students undertake construction of a given minor product.
  • Students undertake construction of major product of their own design.

Folio

  • Students undertake the design, investigation, planning and evaluation of a major product of their own design

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Product (50%)

  • Construction of a given Minor Product
  • Construction of a student designed Major Product

Skills (20%)

  • Hand Skills test
  • Machine skills test
  • Material application testing and investigation

30% External Assessment:

  • Investigation folio based on the major product design and construction

Information Technology


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Business Enterprise & Technology

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in a semester of Stage 1 Information Technology

Subject Overview

Students investigate existing IT systems to discover their function and how their components interact. They analyse issues associated with network security and computer networks basics. Students develop and apply specialised knowledge and understanding within given tasks and use a range of skills and techniques to create their own database systems to be tested and evaluated. Students develop the ability to critically analyse and reflect on issues related to the increased use of and dependence on computer-based systems in society, and investigate the associated ethics. Students develop multimedia programming skills to problem solve programming issues.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Information Technology through the following topics:

Information Systems

  • Students examine the components of a typical information system
  • Students analyse and existing business information system

Computer Systems

  • Students examine the components of a typical micro-computer system and the concepts of computer use.
  • Students study the basics of computer networks and communications technology;
  • Students investigate issues associated with the development of information.

Relational Databases

  • Develop an understanding of database principles;
  • Construct a relational database that stores data efficiently;
  • Use a problem-solving approach of the systems development life cycle to build an information system.

Multimedia Programming

  • Develop an understanding of programming by constructing an application program and developing in a multimedia environment;
  • Use a problem-solving approach of the systems development life cycle to fix an interactive multimedia system.

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Folio (20%)

  • Analysis of a business information system.
  • Oral presentation on data security related to online banking.
  • Computer systems written test.
  • Investigation report on using multimedia programming software for web design.

Project (20%)

  • Design and create a business database.
  • Document the design process.

Skills and Application (30%)

  • Database Skills test.
  • Multimedia programming skills test.
  • Multimedia programming problem solving and documentation test.

30% External Assessment:

  • Students undertake an external examination set by the SACE Board.

Information Processing and Publishing


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Business Enterprise & Technology

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in a semester of Stage 1 Information Processing & Publishing or Information Technology

Subject Overview

Students apply practical skills and design principles to provide creative solutions to text-based communication tasks, using imagination and creativity to make proposals and choices. They use the design process to apply problem-solving, critical-thinking, and decision-making skills. They learn a variety of strategies for meeting identified needs of the client. Students create both hard-copy and electronic text-based publications, and document the development process. Students identify and use the computer hardware and software to process, manage and communicate information in a range of contexts including editorial publication or product design. They analyse the impacts and consequences of the use of publishing technologies.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Information Processing & Publishing through the following topics:

Desktop Publishing

  • Students develop knowledge and understanding of the design process in developing print based documents.

Electronic Publishing

  • Students develop knowledge and understanding of the design process in developing electronic documents and websites

Product and Documentation

  • Develop a product for a chosen scenario
  • Document the investigating, devising, producing and evaluation of the product

Issues Analysis

  • Perform an analysis and evaluation of the impacts of social, ethical and legal issues related to the selected investigation

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Issues Analysis (30%)

  • an investigation of an issue
  • an investigation of a technical operational understanding

Practical Skills (40%)

  • Desktop publishing in designing print based solutions
  • Electronic Publishing of electronic documents and webpages

30% External Assessment:

  • Product and Documentation

Business and Enterprise


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Business Enterprise & Technology

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in both semesters of Stage 1 Business & Enterprise or English (English, English Literary Studies or Essential English)

Subject Overview

Students learn about successful management in personal, business, and social contexts, on a local, national, and global scale. They gain knowledge and understanding of business operations; develop financial and technological skills; participate in planning, developing, and controlling business activities; and evaluate decisions on business practices. Students have the opportunity to engage with innovations and ideas, as well as to reflect on current business and enterprise issues and make informed decisions. Students assess the impact and effects of business, enterprise, and technology on the economy, environment, and the wellbeing and lifestyle of individuals and communities.

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Business and Enterprise through the following topics:

The business environment

  • The role of business in the local, Australian and Global environments; Business classification methods

Business and Management

  • The nature and classification of management structures and theories

Business and Marketing

  • Students will learn and apply the elements of a marketing plan, market research, product development, marketing strategies and marketing ethical and legal conduct

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment

Folio (30%)

  • Test
  • Investigation of an ethics issue and business trends
  • Case studies

Issue Study (20%)

  • Independently selected business issue investigation

Practical (20%)

  • An oral presentation and Marketing plan

30% External Assessment:

  • Business Situational Analysis (research on a small to medium business)

Specialist Mathematics


(20 Credits Full Year) Learning Area: Mathematics

Pre-requisite Information: At least a C in both semesters of Stage 1 Mathematical Methods and Specialist Mathematics.

Co-requisite Information: Students must also study Stage 2 Mathematical Methods

Subject Overview

Specialist Mathematics draws on and deepens students’ mathematical knowledge, skills and understanding, and provides opportunities for students to develop their skills in using rigorous mathematical arguments and proofs, using mathematical models. 

Students undertake study in Stage 2 Specialist Mathematics through the following topics:

Mathematical Induction

  • This topic builds on students’ study of Mathematical Induction from Stage 1. As students’ work through Stage 2 material, opportunities will arise to apply this method of proof in many contexts such as trigonometry, complex numbers and matrices.

Complex Numbers

  • The Cartesian form of complex numbers was introduced in Stage 1, this is now extended to polar form. The arithmetic of complex numbers is developed and their geometric interpretation as an expression of the number line into a number plane is emphasised.

Functions and Sketching Graphs

  • The study of functions and techniques of graph sketching, introduced in Stage 1 Mathematics, is extended and applied in the exploration of inverse functions and the sketching of graphs of composite functions involving absolute value, reciprocal, and rational functions.

Vectors in Three Dimensions

  • The study of vectors was introduced in Stage 1 Mathematics with a focus on vectors in two-dimensional space. Three-dimensional vectors are now introduced, enabling the study of lines and planes in three dimensions, their intersections, and the angles they form. Further development of vector methods of proof enables students to solve geometric problems in three dimensions.

Integration Techniques and Applications

  • Integration techniques developed in Topic 3 of Stage 2 Mathematical Methods are extended to a greater range of trigonometric functions and composite functions, using inverse trigonometric functions and integration by parts. These techniques are applied to finding the areas between curves and the volumes of solids of revolution.

Rates of Change and Differential Equations

  • This topic continues the study of differentiation and integration of functions. Calculus techniques are applied to vectors and simple differential equations. The study of rates of change and differential equations demonstrates applications of learning throughout this subject, in a range of contexts.

Assessment

Stage 2 assessment is comprised of 70% school-based assessment which is externally moderated by the SACE Board and 30% external assessment which is externally marked by the SACE Board. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

70% School Based Assessment:

Skills and Application Task (50%)

  • Students undertake six Skills and Application tasks in the form of topic tests.
  • The equivalent of one Skills and Application test will be undertaken without the use of notes or a calculator

Mathematical Investigation (20%)

  • Students will undertake one Mathematical Investigations. Students are required to investigate mathematical relationships, concepts, or problems, which may be set in an applied context.

External Assessment (30%)

  • A three-hour examination set by SACE that is designed to test students’ abilities to work independently to demonstrate their understanding of content, skills and process. All topics are examinable.